Sunday Shorts (06/14)

Josh Harris: My Run-in with Borat

A great story on the need for discernment:

Thoughts on Evangelical Superstardom

Kevin DeYoung offers a very insightful follow-up to John Piper’s recent article on Hero Worship v. Holy Emulation. Here’s an extremely important excerpt:

[D]on’t like someone just because others do, and don’t dislike someone just because others like him. Both are dangers in a celebrity culture. Some people wait on the corner just looking for bandwagons they can hop on. Others–the too cool for school crowd–have a dire fear of being a part of something popular. These folks decide to dislike an author or pastor or speaker or band or movie just because all their friends rave about them. I understand the reaction, but you don’t have to be a groupie to be edified. Don’t like Calvinism or Piper or Driscoll or whatever because it’s cool. And don’t be the cynical I-hate-labels, why-are-Christians-such-lemmings person either. Give thanks for godliness where you see it, the gospel where you hear it, and good examples when you can find them.

Read the whole article at Kevin’s blog.

The Perfect Technology

Tim Challies wrote this enjoyable article on why he feels books are the perfect technology:

…there is more to a book than its words. A book is an experience, and the experience includes the media through which we consume those words. Reading a book printed on paper, reading a book on a reading device and listening to a recording of a book are, at least in some way, different experiences.

Read the rest at Challies.com.

In case you missed it

Here are a few of this week’s notable posts:

The Persevering Prophet: I Know the Plans I Have for You Exploring the meaning of that famous coffee-cup verse, Jeremiah 29:11.

Book Review: Agape Leadership Reviewing spiritual leadership lessons from the life of RC Chapman.

Made in the Image of God: Choice How humanity images God through the ability to make choices

I Have No Words Zack Morris(!) appears on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon. I am shocked that Mark-Paul Gosselaar didn’t break character once.