The First Christmas Carol by Charles Haddon Spurgeon, part three

 

Read part one and part two of “The First Christmas Carol” by Charles Haddon Spurgeon 


 

Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace,
good will toward men.

—Luke 2:14— 

III. I must now bring before you the third point. There are some PROPHETIC UTTERANCES contained in these words. 

The angels sang “Glory to God in the highest, on earth peace, good will toward men.” But I look around, and what see I in the wide, wide world? I do not see God honored. I see the heathen bowing down before their idols; I mark the Romanist casting himself before the rotten rags of his relics, and the ugly figures of his images. I look about me, and I see tyranny lording it over the bodies and souls of men; I see God forgotten; I see a worldly race pursuing mammon; I see a bloody race pursuing Moloch; I see ambition riding like Nimrod over the land, God forgotten, his name dishonored. 

And was this all the angels sang about? Is this all that made them sing “Glory to God in the highest?” 

Ah! no. There are brighter days approaching. 

They sang, “Peace on earth.” But I hear still the clarion of war; and the cannon’s horrid roar: not yet have they turned the sword into a ploughshare, and the spear into a pruning-hook! War still reigns. Is this all that the angels sang about? And whilst I see wars to the ends of the earth, am I to believe that this was all the angels expected? Ah! no, brethren; the angels’ song is big with prophecy; it travails in birth with glories. A few more years, and he that lives them out shall see why angels sang; a few more years, and he that will come shall come, and will not tarry. 

Christ the Lord will come again, and when he cometh he shall cast the idols from their thrones; he shall dash down every fashion of heresy and every shape of idolatry; he shall reign from pole to pole with illimitable sway; he shall reign, when like a scroll, yon blue heavens have passed away. No strife shall vex Messiah’s reign, no blood shall then be shed; they’ll hang the useless helmet high, and study war no more. The hour is approaching when the temple of Janus shall be shut for ever, and when cruel Mars shall be hooted from the earth. 

The day is coming when the lion shall eat straw like the ox, when the leopard shall lie down with the kid; when the weaned child shall put his hand upon the cockatrice den and play with the asp. The hour approaches; the first streaks of the sunlight have made glad the age in which we live. Lo, he comes, with trumpets and with clouds of glory; he shall come for whom we look with joyous expectation, whose coming shall be glory to his redeemed, and confusion to his enemies. Ah! brethren, when the angels sang this there was an echo through the long aisles of a glorious future. That echo was— 

“Hallelujah! Christ the Lord
God Omnipotent shall reign.” 

Ay, and doubtless the angels heard by faith the fulness of the song, 

“Hark! the song of jubilee
Loud as mighty thunders’ roar,
Or the fulness of the sea,
When it breaks upon the shore.
Christ the Lord Omnipotent reigns.” 

IV. Now, I have one more lesson for you, and I have done. That lesson is PRECEPTIVE. 

I wish everybody that keeps Christmas this year, would keep it as the angels kept it. There are many persons who, when they talk about keeping Christmas, mean by that the cutting of the bands of their religion for one day in the year, as if Christ were the Lord of misrule, as if the birth of Christ should be celebrated like the orgies of Bacchus. 

There are some very religious people, that on Christmas would never forget to go to church in the morning; they believe Christmas to be nearly as holy as Sunday, for they reverence the tradition of the elders. Yet their way of spending the rest of the day is very remarkable; for if they see their way straight up stairs to their bed at night, it must be by accident. They would not consider they had kept Christmas in a proper manner, if they did not verge on gluttony and drunkenness. They are many who think Christmas cannot possibly be kept, except there be a great shout of merriment and mirth in the house, and added to that the boisterousness of sin. 

Now, my brethren, although we, as successors of the Puritans, will not keep the day in any religious sense whatever, attaching nothing more to it than to any other day: believing that every day may be a Christmas for ought we know, and wishing to make every day Christmas, if we can, yet we must try to set an example to others how to behave on that day; and especially since the angels gave glory to God: let us do the same. 

Once more the angels said, “Peace to men:” let us labor if we can to make peace next Christmas day. 

Now, old gentleman, you won’t take your son in: he has offended you. Fetch him at Christmas. “Peace on earth;” you know: that is a Christmas Carol. Make peace in your family. 

Now, brother, you have made a vow that you will never speak to your brother again. Go after him and say, “Oh, my dear fellow, let not this day’s sun go down upon our wrath.” Fetch him in, and give him your hand. Now, Mr. Tradesman, you have an opponent in trade, and you have said some very hard words about him lately. If you do not make the matter up today, or tomorrow, or as soon as you can, yet do it on that day. 

That is the way to keep Christmas, peace on earth and glory to God. And oh, if thou hast anything on thy conscience, anything that prevents thy having peace of mind, keep thy Christmas in thy chamber, praying to God to give thee peace; for it is peace on earth, mind, peace in thyself, peace with thyself, peace with thy fellow men, peace with thy God. And do not think thou hast well celebrated that day till thou canst say, “O God, 

“With the world, myself, and thee
I ere I sleep at peace will be.” 

And when the Lord Jesus has become your peace, remember, there is another thing, good will towards men. 

Do not try to keep Christmas without keeping good will towards men. You are a gentleman, and have servants. Well, try and set their chimneys on fire with a large piece of good, substantial beef for them. If you are men of wealth, you have poor in your neighborhood. Find something wherewith to clothe the naked, and feed the hungry, and make glad the mourner. Remember, it is good will towards men. Try, if you can, to show them good will at this special season; and if you will do that, the poor will say with me, that indeed they wish there were six Christmases in the year. 

Let each one of us go from this place determined, that if we are angry all the year round, this next week shall be an exception; that if we have snarled at everybody last year, this Christmas time we will strive to be kindly affectionate to others; and if we have lived all this year at enmity with God, I pray that by his Spirit he may this week give us peace with him; and then, indeed, my brother, it will be the merriest Christmas we ever had in all our lives. You are going home to your father and mother, young men; many of you are going from your shops to your homes. 

You remember what I preached on last Christmas time. Go home to thy friends, and tell them what the Lord hath done for thy soul, and that will make a blessed round of stories at the Christmas fire. If you will each of you tell your parents how the Lord met with you in the house of prayer; how, when you left home, you were a gay, wild blade, but have now come back to love your mother’s God, and read your father’s Bible. Oh, what a happy Christmas that will make! 

What more shall I say? May God give you peace with yourselves; may he give you good will towards all your friends, your enemies, and your neighbors; and may he give you grace to give glory to God in the highest. I will say no more, except at the close of this sermon to wish every one of you, when the day shall come, the happiest Christmas you ever had in your lives. 

“Now with angels round the throne,
Cherubim and seraphim,
And the church, which still is one,
Let us swell the solemn hymn;
Glory to the great I AM!
Glory to the Victim Lamb. 

Blessing, honour, glory, might,
And dominion infinite,
To the Father of our Lord,
To the Spirit and the Word;
As it was all worlds before,
Is, and shall be evermore.”

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  • Keystone

    The Resurgence is on the Blog roll here.

    That blog posted an outstanding list of Spurgeon productions, and asks for any additions they may have missed (likely, given the ubiquity of Spurgeon).

    This list challenges one to read all of Spurgeon in a year as a Happy New Year post. Be sure to check out this marvelous resource:

    http://www.theresurgence.com/spurgeon_recommended_readings

    • http://hardwords.wordpress.com Aaron Armstrong

      Awesome resource list! Thanks for including the link :) Now I’m tempted to try and do that… but it would only hurt me (the pile of books I’ve got to read is already massive, so I think my wife would be very upset if I took on that challenge).

      • Keystone

        You come up with a decent biblical name for your new child in two or three months and your wife will forgive any transgressions you make during the New Year. The child is, of course, well prayed for last year and still.

        We pick names based on what we like and how it sounds; but God authors that “like” and that “sound” for His child…… on loan to you for 18 years.
        Embrace the time.

        • http://hardwords.wordpress.com Aaron Armstrong

          Done and done :)