Tell Me What to Review!

One of the great things about reviewing books is that you get to read a lot of different material that you probably wouldn’t purchase on your own. Every once in a while, though, you find yourself in a bit of a dilemma:

Trying to decide what to review!

That’s where you, dear reader, can help.

I’ve got a list of three books and I want you to tell me which you want to see me review.

They are:

Sun Stand Still Cover

Sun Stand Still by Steven Furtick

About the book:

If you’re not DARING TO BELIEVE GOD for the impossible,
you may be SLEEPING THROUGH
some of the BEST PARTS of your Christian Life.

“This book is not a Snuggie. The words on these pages will not go down like Ambien. I’m not writing to calm or coddle you. With God’s help, I intend to incite a riot in your mind. Trip your breakers and turn out the lights in your favorite hiding places of insecurity and fear. Then flip the switch back on so that God’s truth can illuminate the divine destiny that may have been lying dormant inside you for years.

In short, I’m out to activate your audacious faith. To inspire you to ask God for the impossible. And in the process, to reconnect you with your God-sized purpose and potential.”

The Next Christians by Gabe Lyons

About the book:

Turn on a cable news show or pick up any news magazine, and you get the impression that Christian America is on its last leg. The once dominant faith is now facing rapidly declining church attendance, waning political influence, and an abysmal public perception. More than 76% of Americans self-identify as Christians, but many today are ashamed to carry the label.

While many Christians are bemoaning their faith’s decline, Gabe Lyons is optimistic that Christianity’s best days are yet to come. In the wake of the stunning research from his bestselling book, unChristian, which revealed the growing disenchantment among young generations for Christians, Lyons has witnessed the beginnings of a new iteration of the faith. Marked by Lyons’ brutal honesty and unvarying generosity, Lyons exposes a whole movement of Christians—Evangelicals, Mainline, Protestants, Orthodox, Pentecostals, and others—who desire to be a force for restoration even as they proclaim the Christian Gospel. They want the label Christian to mean something good, intelligent, authentic, and beautiful.

The next generation of Christians, Lyons argues, embodies six revolutionary characteristics:

“When Christians incorporate these characteristics throughout the fabric of their lives, a fresh, yet orthodox way of being Christian springs forth. The death of yesterday becomes the birth of a great tomorrow. The end of an era becomes a beautiful new beginning. In this way, the end of Christian America becomes good news for Christians.”

In THE NEXT CHRISTIANS, Lyons disarms readers by speaking as a candid observer rather than cultural crusader. Where other people shout, Lyons speaks in a measured tone offering helpful analysis of our current reality while casting a vision for how to be a Christian in a world disenchanted with the faith. Both a celebration and a reckoning, THE NEXT CHRISTIANS combines current day models and relevant research with stories of a new generation of Christian leaders. If you are worried by what you see transpiring around you, this book will take you on a surprising social exploration in hopes that you too will restore confidence in your faith.


Mere Churchianity by Michael Spencer

About the book:

Have you left the church in search of Jesus?

Studies show that one in four young adults claim no formal religious affiliation, and church leaders have long known that this generation is largely missing on Sunday morning. Hundreds of thousands of “church leavers” have had a mentor and pastor, however, in Michael Spencer, known to blog readers as the Internet Monk. Spencer guided a vast online congregation in its search for a more honest and more immediate practice of Christian faith.

Spencer discovered the truth that church officials often miss, which is that many who leave the church do so in an attempt to find Jesus. For years on his blog Spencer showed de-churched readers how to practice their faith without the distractions of religious institutions. Sadly, he died in 2010. But now that his last message is available in Mere Churchianity, you can benefit from the biblical wisdom and compassionate teaching that always have been hallmarks of his ministry.

With Mere Churchianity, Spencer’s writing will continue to point the disenchanted and dispossessed to a Jesus-shaped spirituality. And along the way, his teachings show how you can find others who will go with you on the journey.

It’s now up to you! Leave a comment with your pick or vote using the handy-dandy poll:

Voting begins now and ends on Wednesday at 5 PM EST. The book with the most votes will be announced on Thursday.

  • http://vesselproject.com Keiki Hendrix

    I’d like to know your thoughts on ‘Sun Stand Still’ – that’s what I voted for.

    • http://hardwords.wordpress.com Aaron Armstrong

      That may be the winner — it’s currently leading the pack :)

  • http://seanchandler.net Sean Chandler

    I voted for Furtick (which I have but haven’t read), but I guess I’m also interested in your take on the Internet Monk’s book too. I read it a couple of months back.

  • http://hardwords.wordpress.com Aaron Armstrong

    Yeah, I’ve been intrigued by Michael’s book since I first heard about it; Right now it’s still leading the pack, but it’s a tight race :)

  • Emily

    I voted for sun stand still, but I must admit it is partially because I am skeptical, and partially because I want you to learn how to pray for a free minivan.

    • http://hardwords.wordpress.com Aaron Armstrong

      Nice – I also want to learn how to pray for a free minivan.