A Spiritual Health Diagnostic

Perhaps one of the most impactful elements of Together for Adoption last week, aside from Tullian’s awesome message, was something that came out of the pre-conference event with Tim Chester. There, he offered a really helpful diagnostic he called the four G’s—four liberating truths about God:

  1. God is great—so we do not have to be in control
  2. God is glorious—so we do not have to fear others
  3. God is good—so we do not have to look elsewhere
  4. God is gracious—so we do not have to prove ourselves

These may seem like they’re incredibly obvious, but the most obvious things tend to be the easiest to overlook. Tim’s questions were particularly helpful:

What happens when you fail to believe each of these truths about God? And how is this changed when you do believe these truths about God?

During a small group exercise, we were asked to look at the problem of busyness in light of these diagnostic questions—if you’re overly busy, in what ways could it be caused by failing to believe one or more of these truths about God? What does it say when our first thought about the amount of work we have to do is, “If I don’t, no one else will?” Could that not be a desire for control? Could we be working ourselves to death because we’re trying to prove ourselves to others who we think may not believe what we do has value? Could we be seeking the approval of others by taking on far more than we’re reasonably able to accomplish?

These are questions I’ve been mulling over since Thursday when we went through this exercise. Not sure if I’ve come to any definitive answers for myself just yet, but it’s definitely an exercise that I’m finding useful. I hope it will be for you as well.

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  • http://twitter.com/nateclaiborne Nathaniel Claiborne

    Did you know those come from his book You Can Change? He elaborates more on it there, but I wasn’t at the conference so I don’t know if the chapter in the book and the conference message overlapped.

    Either way, thanks for sharing, this is a great/good/gracious/glorious truth about how God connects directly to our struggles!

    • http://www.bloggingtheologically.com Aaron Armstrong

      I did not know that, actually—I’ve not had a chance to read You Can Change yet and he didn’t footnote it in his handouts :)

      Not sure how much they overlap, but I suspect there’s a fair bit of crossover between his conference messages and his book on the Trinity

      • http://twitter.com/nateclaiborne Nathaniel Claiborne

        I’ll have to check into that, I’ve got his short Trinity book, but just loaned it to a friend. In You Can Change, the material takes up about a chapter though, but I think his Trinity book was written earlier.

  • Anonymous

    Any chance you have the link to download the message? Couldn’t find it on my own searching.

    • http://www.bloggingtheologically.com Aaron Armstrong

      Unfortunately the audio doesn’t seem to be available at this time. Not sure if they’re making it available or not. I did take extensive notes, though: 

      Tim Chester event: Session 1 | Session 2 | Session 3

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  • Anonymous

    nice post…

  • Anonymous

    nice post…