How is it With Our Souls?

We live in an age of special spiritual danger. Never perhaps since the world began was there such an immense amount of mere outward profession of religion as there is in the present day. A painfully large proportion of all the congregations in the land consists of unconverted people, who know nothing of heart-religion, never come to the Lord’s Table, and never confess Christ in their daily lives. Myriads of those who are always running after preachers, and crowding to hear special sermons, are nothing better than empty tubs, and tinkling cymbals, without a bit of real vital Christianity at home.

The life of many religious persons, I fear, in this age, is nothing better than a “continual course of spiritual tasting.” They are always morbidly craving fresh excitement; and they seem to care little what it is if they only get it. All preaching seems to be the same to them; and they appear unable to “see differences” so long as they hear what is clever, have their ears tickled, and sit in a crowd. Worst of all, there are hundreds of young believers who are so infected with the same love of excitement, that they actually think it a duty to be always seeking it. Insensible almost to themselves, they take up a kind of hysterical, sensational, sentimental Christianity, until they are never content with the “old paths” and, like the Athenians, are always running after something new.

To see a calm-minded young believer, who is not stuck up, self confident, self-conceited, and more ready to teach than learn, but content with a daily steady effort to grow up into Christ’s likeness, and to do Christ’s work quietly and inconspicuously, at home, is really becoming almost a rarity! They show how little deep root they have, and how little knowledge of their hearts, by noise, forwardness, readiness to contradict and set down old Christians, and over-weaning trust in their own fancied soundness and wisdom! Well will it be for many young professors of this age if they do not end, after being tossed about for a while, and “carried to and fro by every wind of doctrine,” by joining some petty, narrow-minded, censorious sect, or embracing some senseless, unreasoning heresy. Surely, in times like these there is great need for self- examination. When we look around us, we may well ask, “How is it with our souls?”

Adapted from J.C. Ryle, Practical Religion

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  • http://philippians314.squarespace.com/ Kim

    Wow!  Things don’t really change, do they?

    • http://www.bloggingtheologically.com Aaron Armstrong

      Nope, they never do.