Simplicity of faith is akin to the highest knowledge

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I can bear witness that children can understand the Scriptures; for I am sure that, when but a child, I could have discussed many a knotty point of controversial theology, having heard both sides of the question freely stated among my father’s circle of friends. In fact, children are capable of understanding some things in early life, which we hardly understand afterwards. Children have eminently a simplicity of faith, and simplicity of faith is akin to the highest knowledge; indeed, I know not that there is much distinction between the simplicity of a child and the genius of the profoundest mind. He who receives things simply, as a child, will often have ideas which the man who is prone to make a syllogism of everything will never attain unto.

If you wish to know whether children can be taught, I point you to many in our churches, and in pious families—not prodigies, but such as we frequently see—Timothys and Samuels, and little girls, too, who have early come to know a Saviour’s love. As soon as a child is capable of being lost, it is capable of being saved. As soon as a child can sin, that child can, if God’s grace assists it, believe and receive the Word of God. As soon as children can learn evil, be assured that they are competent, under the teaching of the Holy Spirit, to learn good.

C.H. Spurgeon, Autobiography Volume 1: The Early Years (Banner of Truth), p. 46
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