Links I like

The God Who Finds Us

Ronnie Martin:

What’s interesting about doubt and despair is that they cause our focus to center on the very thing that God wants us to stop focusing on: ourselves. He knows that ever since Adam and Eve shifted the desire they originally had for God over to themselves, we inherited something we’d struggle with our entire lives. Us. It’s this self-consuming focus onus that ultimately casts a dark shadow of doubt over our hearts and minds. And the world tells us this is a good thing. How many times a day do we hear these lines?


Get Faithfulness Under Fire for $5 at Ligonier.org

The hardcover edition of Faithfulness Under Fire: The Story of Guido de Bres by William Boekestein is featured in today’s $5 Friday sale at Ligonier.org. Also on sale:

  • Welcome to a Reformed Church by Daniel Hyde (ePub)
  • Heroes of the Christian Faith teaching series by R.C. Sproul (audio download)
  • Christianity and Liberalism by J. Gresham Machen (paperback)

$5 Friday ends tonight at 11:59:59 Eastern.


Osteen’s folly

Marty Duren:

In the past Osteen has admitted to not being a theologian. That is well and good…Not being a theologian is not the problem.

Yesterday sometime this quote was posted to the Facebook page of Joel Osteen Ministries:

When we come to the end of this life, we’re not going to stand before any person and give our account. We’re going to stand before Almighty God. He is going to ask, ‘Did you become who I created you to be? Did you stay true to what I put in your heart?’


My biggest blogging mistake: “Holy Hip Hop”

David Murray provides a wonderful example of how repentance plays out online:

I’ve been thinking a lot about the whole subject of “Holy Hip Hop” or “Christian Rap” since I wrote three blog posts on the subject a couple of years ago. The upshot of it all is that I’ve taken down the blog posts and I want to apologize to my African American brothers and sisters in Christ for four wrongs.


Going to Pastor an Established Church?

Darryl Dash:

I’ve spent twenty years pastoring established churches, and about a year beginning to plant a new church. I’m not really sure which one is harder. I do know, though, that I’d go about pastoring an established church differently than before. Here’s what I would do differently.

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