Links I like (weekend edition)

The “right side of history” is full of re-writes

Ted Olsen:

But the rhetoric of the “right side of history” (or better, History, for it is always personified as a single, clearheaded judge) is nevertheless powerful. It’s powerful even for biblically minded evangelical Protestants. One key reason is that postwar evangelicalism has always been driven by a passion to “speak the language of the culture” (especially the language of mainstream youth culture). Evangelicals’ ability to respond to and adapt to changing cultural assumptions has long been a point of pride and passion—a key distinction between it and fundamentalism. Evangelical leaders are not just incessant trendwatchers, but extrapolators. It’s hard not to draw a line from Massachusetts to California to the other 11 states that now allow same-sex marriage and not assume that the number will climb to 50 within months, if not years. To many evangelicals, fighting same-sex marriage now seems as quaint as fighting card playing. Call us wrong and we shrug it off. Call us quaint or irrelevant and we howl.

“Not having my emotions manipulated is such a weird experience”

Yep:

How much of a pastor’s vacation time should he use?

Brian Croft:

A few years ago, I was lovingly confronted by a dear friend and fellow pastor that I was not using all my vacation time.  In his rebuke, he explained to me the reasons I should be taking every day of vacation the church gives me, which I had never done.  Here was the basis for his thoughtful, insightful, and wise argument.

Is it OK for a Christian to drop OMGs?

Erik Raymond:

It is not uncommon to hear people toss around God’s name as the exclamation point of their frustration. Their angst or excitement is not usually directed at God but nevertheless his name seems to find its way into our canned responses (even in texts with “OMG”). In the last year I have heard an uptick of Christians engaging in the same routine. So here is the question, “Is it OK to drop OMG’s (Oh, my God!)?”

Answer: No (with some qualification).