Links I like

Is it My Fault? A new book by Justin and Lindsey Holcomb

Today, the new book by Justin and Lindsey Holcomb, Is It My Fault?: Hope and Healing for Those Suffering Domestic Violence, officially releases. The book “was written for those suffering domestic abuse—typically women—and serves as a resource on healing from the emotional pain resulting from domestic violence by giving a clear understanding of what the Bible says about violence against women.”

Today through May 15th, Moody Publishers is offering readers 40 percent off your purchase of the book using the coupon code 40%Fault. Go here to take advantage of this deal.

Christ and Pop Culture

A while back I started reading an excellent website, Christ and Pop Culture. They’re producing some terrific content, increasingly some of the stuff I look forward to most when I check my feed reader. They’ve got a ton of potential to grow and have a lot of dedicated volunteer writers and editors, but they’ve got a teeny problem: being able to grow means money. Give their appeal a read and consider signing up for a membership.

And What About Divorce?

Kevin DeYoung:

After last week’s post on gluttony, a host of similar comments bubbled up about divorce. Isn’t it hypocritical of Christians to protest so loudly about homosexuality when the real marital problem in our churches is divorce? Over many years debating these issues in my own denomination, I’ve often encountered the divorce retort: “It’s easy for you to pick on homosexuality because that’s the issue in your church. But you don’t follow the letter of your own law. If you did, you would be talking about divorce, since that’s the bigger problem in conservative churches.”

When it comes to debating homosexuality among Christians, the issue of divorce is both a smokescreen and a fire. It is a smokescreen because the two issues-divorce and homosexuality-are far from identical.

When We Are Not Robustly Trinitarian, Our Gospel Will Not Be Robustly Christian

Michael Reeves

HT: Justin Taylor

18 Principles from Pixar’s Culture

Trevin Wax:

The new book from Ed Catmull, co-founder of Pixar, is a must-read. Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration is fascinating in its portrayal of Pixar’s history of successes and failures, and insightful in its boiling down of Pixar experience into transferable principles.

From the book, here are 18 lessons we can learn from the culture of Pixar.

The Only ‘Always’ in Health Care

Robert Cutillo:

Injustice in health care is a question I ponder regularly in caring for those who are mostly poor. But it has forced me to ask another question: “What can we reasonably expect healthcare to do for us?” Even if I were able to obtain every available service for my patient, I could not guarantee her freedom from pain. I could not promise her satisfaction. In my experience, even with the best of hopes and intentions, and despite modern preconceptions to the contrary, I have found that our needs and expectations for care of the body always exceed what is possible. If this is true, is there is anything we can reliably hope for in health care? And what might it look like to live faithfully in the resistant gap between what we have and what we hope for?

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