Links I like

Links

You and Me Forever

Today is the last day to get You and Me Forever by Francis & Lisa Chan free from ChristianAudio.com. If you’re not sure about the book, be sure to check out my thoughts on it here.

No Grey Area

Kevin DeYoung nails it, as did Marshall Segal the day prior.

Girls vs boys

Yep:

Learning My Children are not Machines

Aaron Earls:

When I push the button on my laptop, it should start up. If it doesn’t, it can’t blame its nonexistent emotions. It should respond immediately and appropriately because that’s what it has been created to do.

In evaluating my parenting, I realized much of my anger with my children arose from my having the wrong perspective about them. I was viewing them as if they were machines.

Can Jobs Be Stolen?

R. Campbell Sproul’s on the right track here: “Jobs are not property, and since jobs are not property, it is impossible to steal them.”

The Act of Rigorous Forgiving

David Brooks:

There’s something sad in Brian Williams’s need to puff up his Iraq adventures and something barbaric in the public response.

The sad part is the reminder that no matter how high you go in life and no matter how many accolades you win, it’s never enough. The desire for even more admiration races ahead. Career success never really satisfies. Public love always leaves you hungry. Even very famous people can do self-destructive things in an attempt to seem just a little cooler.

Why Is the Number of the Beast 666?

Greg Beale:

The problem is that no clear identification can be made linking 666 with any particular ancient historical name. Attempts have been made to alter spellings and incorporate titles to try to make a multitude of names fit, but nothing conclusive has emerged. Most commonly, the number has been identified with Nero, on the basis of a Hebrew transliteration of the title “Nero Caesar.” However, this option flounders on confusion concerning the exact Hebrew spelling of Caesar, and does not fit the fact that John’s readers were largely Greek-speaking, and that Nero had many titles other than Caesar. Additionally, if John were using gematria, he would have alerted his readers by saying something like, “the number in Hebrew (or Greek) is . . .” as he uses the phrases “in Hebrew” or “in Greek” in 9:11 and 16:16, when he wants to draw the readers’ attention to certain significance.

My five favorite podcasts

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I used to listen to dozens of podcasts; these days, I only listen to a few. Some I dropped because I grew bored with them. Others, because the material was no longer helpful or beneficial for me to listen to. But there are a few I consistently enjoy (even if I don’t listen to every episode):

1. 5 Minutes in Church HistoryStephen Nichols offers listeners digestible glimpses back at the people, places and events that have shaped the story of Christianity. (And for the 90s alt-rock nerd, yes, that is The Cranberries being used as the intro music.)

2. The Briefing. Albert Mohler’s daily analysis of the news from a Christian worldview is a must-listen in the Armstrong home (full disclosure: my wife has a crush on Mohler’s brain). It’s obviously very “America” in focus, but that doesn’t stop it from being one of the first we go to each day.

3. Mere Fidelity. Matthew Lee Anderson, Derek Rishmawy, Andrew Wilson, and Alastair Roberts’ Reformed-ish podcast is consistently enjoyable and always worth your time. Be sure to check out the “Ask Us Anything” edition and the response to Peter Enns.

4. The Village Church (sermon audio). In all honesty, I don’t often listen to sermon audio from other churches these days. But when I do, it’s typically this one. Chandler’s long been a preacher I appreciate. The current sermon series, A Beautiful Design, is tremendous.

5. Renewing Your Mind. R.C. Sproul is one of the most brilliant theologians of our day. His ability to distill complex ideas into something intelligible for the average person is nothing short of astounding, and this audio feed is one of the best resources to help you understand the life-giving truths of historic Christianity.

So those are a few of my favorites. What are some of yours?


Photo credit: Colleen AF Venable via photopin cc

(Audio)Book Review: Jesus in the Present Tense by Warren W. Wiersbe

Title: Jesus in the Present Tense: The I AM Statements of Christ
Author: Warren W. Wiersbe
Publisher: David C. Cook/ChristianAudio (2011)

It’s easy for us to be caught up in the past—the mistakes we’ve made, the opportunities we’ve lost, the sins we’ve committed. When we spend all our time focusing on these things, it robs us of our joy. We don’t feel as connected to Christ, nor do we feel the freedom to serve and to give of ourselves fully. But this does not have to be our experience—and by examining the I AM statements of Christ in his latest book, Jesus in the Present Tense, author Warren W. Wiersbe offers readers (and listeners) the hope and freedom that comes from living our lives in the present tense with Christ.

The “I AM” statements of Jesus found in John’s gospel are some of the most poignant examples of Christ’s proclamation of His divinity—and understanding them is crucial to our growth in our love for Christ. After initially dealing with the “I AM” statements that are found throughout the Old Testament, beginning with Moses’ conversation with the Lord in the book of Exodus, Wiersbe addresses with the seven metaphorical “I AM” statements:

  1. I am the bread of life (John 6:35; John 6:48; John 6:51)
  2. I am the light of the world (John 8:12; John 9:5)
  3. I am the door of the sheep (John 10:7; John 10:9)
  4. I am the good shepherd (John 10:11; John 10:14)
  5. I am the resurrection and the life (John 11:25)
  6. I am the way, the truth, and the life (John 14:6)
  7. I am the true vine (John 15:1)

He also takes a couple of surprising turns in dealing with what are known as the absolute I AM statement of Christ (found in John 6:20; John 8:24; John 8:28; John 8:58; and John 18:5) and also what he calls the neglected I AM—Psalm 22:6: [Read more…]