Links I like

I am Ryland

This is so, so good:

I have been shying away from highly controversial topics on this blog recently because I just couldn’t take the drama that naturally associates with it. But I keep hearing the story of Ryland, a child who was born a female, whose parents have transitioned her to male at 5 years old. You can see the full story HERE, but in short, because their daughter identified herself as a boy, and liked “boy” things as opposed to “girl” things, they cut off her hair, bought her “boy” clothes, and have begun telling her, and others, that she is a boy.

I have no degree in early childhood development, nor have I studied psychology. I didn’t even graduate from College.

I am also not here to pass judgement on Ryland’s parents. I believe that they are doing what they believe to be the most loving thing for their child. I’m simply sharing my story because I see so much of my 5-year-old self in this child.

Evangelicals who aren’t evangelicals

Thomas Kidd:

I agree with Swaim [who reviewed Steven Miller’s The Age of Evangelicalism in the Wall Street Journal] that the term evangelical, as used in the media, obscures fundamental differences between those lumped together as people who “feel strongly about their faith.” There are at least four types of Christians who often get cast as evangelicals who really are not evangelicals, if that term has any meaning.

How long does it take to read each book of the Bible?

Helpful chart from Desiring God. Be sure to read the rest of the article, too.

Exodus: Gods and Kings

The latest Hollywood Bible movie, this time starring Batman as Moses:

Should be interesting, at a minimum.

The click-baitiest click bait you ever did click

Mike Leake reminds us of the power of a good title.

8 Witnesses to Jesus as the Son of God and Messiah

Richard Phillips:

Witnesses are essential in establishing any claim to fact. When a news station wants to report an amazing event, it interviews eyewitnesses. We accept the reports of credible witnesses, especially when there are a number of them who agree. The same principle guides our legal system. When credible witnesses testify to an event, we are morally bound to accept what they say as true. In like manner, John’s Gospel presents us with such witnesses to Christ. Leon Morris writes, “[John] is insistent that there is good evidence for the things he sets down. Witness establishes truth.” This emphasis on the validity of witnesses ought to inform our own presentation of the gospel.

What witnesses does John present? Let me list eight of them.

In Praise of the Quiet Time

Megan Hill:

Recently I read “Why I Don’t Pray or Study the Bible (Much),” a Patheos blog post by Ellen Painter Dollar. She recounts how her time in an evangelical college fellowship was her first exposure to the discipline of daily Bible reading and prayer.… Some of Dollar’s skepticism about prayer and Scripture-study comes from her underlying assumptions about the nature of both. I believe the Bible is complete truth, God’s perfect revelation of himself, and essential for a Christian’s life and godliness. Likewise, I have a high view of prayer as one of God’s primary means for communion with his children, for glorifying himself, and for accomplishing his purposes.

June’s top ten articles at Blogging Theologically

top-ten

Let’s take a trip back in time and check out the top ten posts in June:

  1. God Won’t Give You More Than You Can Handle (July 2009)
  2. Preaching and Pragmatism (July 2011)
  3. Church Buildings: They’re actually useful! (December 2009)
  4. Ministry Idolatry (January 2011)
  5. Seven books I’m planning to read this summer (June 2014)
  6. If the gospel isn’t in it, should we be singing it? (June 2014)
  7. God helps those who help themselves (July 2009)
  8. John Piper on Mark Driscoll & John MacArthur (May 2009)
  9. 3 passages I want to preach (but have been afraid to) (June 2014)
  10. Why I’m thankful for the freedom to disagree (June 2014)

And just for fun, here’s a look at the next ten:

  1. Where Is Jesus In The Old Testament? (June 2011)
  2. Why am I thinking about getting an education (again)? (June 2014)
  3. 3 reasons why some churches don’t grow (that you don’t usually hear) (January 2013)
  4. The Gospel (June 2014)
  5. Should every Christian be in a small group? Yep! (June 2014)
  6. The secret of the Christian’s power (June 2014)
  7. Why I won’t read your book on visiting Heaven (January 2013)
  8. 5 books every new Christian should read (May 2014)
  9. What should I review? (June 2014)
  10. Think about what you read (June 2014)

If you haven’t had a chance to already, I hope you’ll take a few minutes today to check out a few of these articles.

Meet some of this summer’s guest bloggers

Every year, I’ve taken some time off during the summer from blogging. It’s a terrific time to unplug, unwind, catch up on my other projects, and give you the chance to read some really great content from a number of different voices.

In year’s past, I’ve put out an open call to readers, but this year I did something a little different and invited a number of friends to join in the fun. Some of these folks are undoubtedly very familiar to readers both here and in the Christian blogosphere in general. Others are new faces you’ll want to get to know.

Here are a few people you’ll be reading some fantastic stuff from in July:

  • Michael Kelley, author of Boring and Wednesdays Were Pretty Normal
  • Rob Tims, author of Southern Fried Faith and discipleship strategist at LifeWay
  • Brandon Hiltibidal, discipleship strategist at LifeWay
  • Ben Reed, author of Starting Small: The Ultimate Small Group Blueprint, and small groups pastor at Long Hollow Baptist Church
  • Amber Van Schooneveld, author of Hope Lives, and one of my partners in crime at Compassion Canada
  • Jacob Abshire, author of Forgiveness and Faith, and founder of Resolute Creative
  • Sarah Van Beveren, blogger and fellow Canadian
  • Ben Riggs of Apex Community Church in Kettering, Ohio
  • Dave Jenkins, director of Servants of Grace

And that’s just a few. Don’t surprised to see more names pop up over the next while.

What will I be doing while I’m away? Among other things, our family will be spending a week in the land of spotty wi-fi (a cottage not too far away from Campbellford, Ontario), catching up on some reading, and, hopefully, making some headway on a couple of projects I’ve let linger for far too long. (Prayer would be appreciated for that.)

Looking forward to being back soon!

Links I like

#HowOldWereYou: Origins of a Heartbreaking Hashtag

Karen Swallow Prior:

A central plot-line in the disturbing but stunning 1999 film American Beauty involves sexual fantasies about a teen girl by the main character, a middle-aged suburban husband and father desperately living out a quiet nightmare version of the American Dream. In a discussion of the film with my then-boss, an older man, a strong Christian leader and educator, he told me, “Any man who says he hasn’t had such fantasies is a liar.” His candor was as rare as it was refreshing. But what he said wasn’t shocking.

Ed Stetzer offers some additional commentary on the post that inspire #TakeDownThatPost and #HowOldWereYou hashtags of last week.

Right Questions Matter

JD Payne:

There are many questions to be asked about church health and mission. Many are being asked with the right heart. But right motives are no guarantee that the right questions are being asked.

We often ask questions with familiarity in mind. This is a good place to begin, but we can’t remain here. Unfortunately, we often stay put. We have not learned the stewardship of questioning.

The right questions matter.

Kindle deals for Christian readers

Crossway has a few books by Kent and Barbara Hughes on sale this week:

Risky Gospel by Owen Strachan is also on sale for 99¢.

Because we’re Christians, kids

Trevin Wax:

There’s a phrase I’ve heard in our home lately. It pops up whenever the kids ask why we do things differently than other people.

I noticed it first when our son asked why he and his sister aren’t allowed to say certain words his friends say.

“Why can’t we talk that way?” he asked.

“Because we’re Christians. Jesus saved us, and we want to honor Him with our lips.”

Perfectionism Will Ruin Your Writing

Marc Cortez shares a helpful quote from Anne Lamott.

Some Observations on Tone of Voice.

Lore Ferguson:

In our day to day life, we’re face to face, tone of voice is heard, body language is seen. On the web, though, and social media, we are left without those necessary cues. If a person uses coarse or aggressive language in a post/comment, and defends their words with, “I just want to have a conversation,” they should understand words that sound conversational to them may sound abusive to someone else. And likewise, someone like me who feels any slight pushback is a personal affront to my character, my spirituality, my soul, and my personhood needs to take a step back and assume a charitable posture.

Look at the Book

A preview of the ongoing video series from John Piper on studying the Bible:

Links I like

New eBook—Good: The Joy of Christian Manhood and Womanhood

A new eBook from Desiring God and CBMW:

We have teamed up with the Council for Biblical Manhood and Womanhood to produce a multi-contributor volume that aims at a fresh articulation of God’s good design in creating men and women. This new resource — the collaboration of 14 contributors — seeks to cast a vision for manhood and womanhood that is rooted more in beauty than mere ideology, more in gladness than mere position.

The book’s aim is to capture and highlight the glorious reality that God, after creating humans male and female, looked at his creation and called it good.

10 Lessons from 10 Years of Public Schooling

Tim Challies:

Last weekend I was a guest on Up for Debate on Moody Radio where we discussed whether or not Christian parents should send their children to public schools. I am not opposed to homeschooling or Christian schooling—not even a little bit—but do maintain that public schooling may also be a legitimate option for Christian families, and this is the perspective they asked me to represent. It is quite a controversial position in parts of the Christian world today.

As I prepared for the show I went back through my archives to find what I had written on the subject in the past. I found that I first wrote about it around eight years ago when my son was in first grade. Well, he is now just days away from his eighth grade graduation and this seems like an opportune time to revisit the subject and to ask, What have we learned in ten years of public schooling (which includes two years of kindergarten)? I spoke to Aileen and together we jotted down a bit of what we’ve learned from having three children in public schools. Here are ten lessons from ten years of public schooling.

Vague Pastors

Josh Reich:

Last week, Carl Lentz, the pastor of Hillsong NYC made his rounds on CNN and Huffington Post. The interviews were fascinating to watch and see what God is doing through Lentz and Hillsong.

In those interviews, gay marriage came up as it always does if you are a pastor.

His answers were an attempt at a non-answer. He said in a sermon, “Some churches want us to give blanket answers on huge issues. Well, my Bible says, be attentive to individual needs. So I’m not gonna make polarizing political statements about certain things in our Christian community right now. No matter who says what, we won’t be pressured into giving blanket statements to individual needs. Never.”

[But] saying he won’t, “Preach on homosexuality” is misleading.

Kindle deals for Christian readers

In addition to all the other deals that have come up so far this week, here are a few more:

One for Your Kids

David Murray:

Hi kids. I usually write a few lines each day for your Mom and Dad, but today I thought I’d write something for you.

I was doing a Bible study about children the other day, and discovered that the most common word God uses when talking about children is “obedience.”

Think Before You Post

Kevin DeYoung:

I’m thankful for blogs and tweets and posts and embeds and links and all the rest. God is no Luddite when it comes to defending his name and proclaiming the gospel. And yet, on many days I would be thrilled if all digital sound and fury disappeared and we went back to the slow churn of books, phone calls, journal articles, newsletters, and (gasp!) face to face conversation.

But we won’t and we aren’t. So we need to think about how to post, what to post, and when to post. As Christians, we need to be more prayerful, careful, and biblical about our online presence. After more than five years of blogging—less than that with Twitter and Facebook—and having gleaned lots of wisdom from others and having made lots of mistakes myself, here are ten things to think about before you hit “publish” on your next blog post, status update, comment, or tweet.

Will Revival Happen Again in Frankfurt?

Stephan Pues:

Today Frankfurt is in many ways a different city. It is a global city, the financial capital of Europe, in the heart of Germany. It is shaped by postmodern thinkers, big companies, and creative people. Skyscrapers, subways, cars, stores, and dense living spaces shape the city. I think Spener would wonder many things if he could walk the streets of his city today. But he would find at least one thing the same: the situation of the church.

May’s top ten articles at Blogging Theologically

top-ten

Let’s take a trip back in time and check out the top ten posts in May:

  1. Four and a half books I shouldn’t have read as a new Christian (May 2014)
  2. 5 books every new Christian should read (May 2014)
  3. Is anyone really surprised? (May 2014)
  4. 7 signs you’re reading a book by a prosperity preacher (January 2014)
  5. God Won’t Give You More Than You Can Handle (July 2009)
  6. 160 of the most terrifying words I’ve ever read (May 2014)
  7. One of the books that most deeply affected my faith (May 2014)
  8. Ministry Idolatry (January 2011)
  9. Preaching and Pragmatism (July 2011)
  10. Church Buildings: They’re actually useful! (December 2009)

And just for fun, here’s a look at the next ten:

  1. Seven really great book covers (May 2014)
  2. New and noteworthy books (May 2014)
  3. Is it My Fault? by Justin and Lindsey Holcomb (May 2014)
  4. God helps those who help themselves (July 2009)
  5. When the h-word slipped (May 2014)
  6. John Piper on Mark Driscoll & John MacArthur (May 2009)
  7. How to talk when we talk about God (May 2014)
  8. Where Is Jesus In The Old Testament? (June 2011)
  9. 3 reasons I’m reading more fiction (May 2014)
  10. Know the Heretics by Justin Holcomb (May 2014)

If you haven’t had a chance to already, I hope you’ll take a few minutes today to check out a few of these articles.

Christian, you can’t win the Internets!

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Blogging—oh, let’s be honest, the Internet—has a tendency to encourage a certain, shall we say, zeal for one’s viewpoint. Simply, many of us just want you to know you’re wrong and make sure you know it (and we won’t let Wheaton’s Law stand in our way).

Emily reminded me of this last night when discussing an article she was reading. Ever since we started thinking about homeschooling, Emily’s been reading the blogs of homeschoolers to get a sense of what to expect. What’s she’s found has been… “interesting.”

Yesterday afternoon she was reading a 2009 article by Reb Bradley on her mistakes as a homeschooling mom, where she confessed that her approach was far too “me-centered” and consumed with outward appearances than the actual well-being of her children. (It’s long, but really good.)

Then she found a response article that, in a nutshell, said, “Nope, you’re wrong; you were right the first time, and you’re wrong to feel the way you do. Here are some Bible verses.”

You can see why this might be unhelpful, right?

Although the Internet encourages a certain kind of zeal for one’s own views, we should always strive for something better. The Internet is not something you can win, therefore we shouldn’t try.

Instead, we should try to do these things:

1. Take a deep breath. Don’t get your fauxtrage on, friends. Or at least, don’t post/tweet/update/pin/plus/twerp when you’ve got it on. Take a deep breath. Go for a walk. Have a cookie. Get away from your device for a while to see if your rage is legit or you’re just a rampaging rageoholic. Who knows? You might just be gassy.

2. Try to actually understand the point. This might be a tall order, but I’m confident it can be done. A great way to do this is to ask good questions, which also means avoid leading or entrapment style ones whenever possible.

3. Keep our mouths shut. Sometimes the best thing we can do when we disagree with something on the Internet is to just say nothing. This is especially important when we’re dealing with other people who really, really want to goad you into a fight with click-baity blog posts and tweets. Remember, those people are trying to win the Internets, too. And if you take the click-bait, they win.


photo credit: Jan Tik via photopin cc

April’s top ten articles at Blogging Theologically

top-ten

Let’s take a trip back in time and check out the top ten posts in April:

  1. Who are the false teachers? (April 2014)
  2. New Easter devotional: The Last Days of Jesus (April 2014)
  3. God Won’t Give You More Than You Can Handle (July 2009)
  4. Would Paul have used video? Here’s a better question… (April 2014)
  5. Church Buildings: They’re actually useful! (December 2009)
  6. Preaching and Pragmatism (July 2011)
  7. Ministry Idolatry (January 2011)
  8. Taking God at His Word by Kevin DeYoung (April 2014)
  9. God helps those who help themselves (July 2009)
  10. Why I may (not) be live-blogging #T4G14 (April 2014)

And just for fun, here’s a look at the next ten:

  1. Where Is Jesus In The Old Testament? (June 2011)
  2. My top 5 highlights from #T4G (April 2014)
  3. Evangelism by Mack Stiles (April 2014)
  4. John Piper on Mark Driscoll & John MacArthur (May 2009)
  5. 4 things I liked and 3 I didn’t about the new Noah movie (March 2014)
  6. What’s on your to-read pile? (April 2014)
  7. The glamor of God-honoring grammar (April 2014)
  8. Choosing a New Preaching Bible (November 2011)
  9. Why I Believe Amillennialism by Matthew Svoboda (July 2010)
  10. The one reason you should support the Gosnell documentary (April 2014)

If you haven’t had a chance to already, I hope you’ll take a few minutes today to check out a few of these articles.

Why I may (not) be live-blogging #T4G14

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Over the last few years of attending conferences, I’ve tended to live-blog them, taking copious notes and sharing them here in real-time or something close to it. This year, although I have no doubt I’ll be taking lots of notes, I’m not sure if I will be live-blogging at T4G. It’s hard work and fun work… but man, it’s a lot of work.

So here are a few reasons why I may or may not do it this time:

1. My notes tend to be more like on-the-fly, loosely paraphrased transcripts. I don’t catch everything, but I do manage to get about 80 percent of what’s said in a pretty faithful form. This is tricky to do, but I know a lot of people find them helpful.

2. I don’t want my note-taking to be distracting to other attendees. Conference venues like the Yum Center tend to not be set up to handle live-blogging well. And because my tendency is to not be a gentle typer, I am concerned about my clickety-clacking distracting the other attendees.

3. Not live-blogging gives a little more flexibility to my schedule. I don’t “have” to be there on time or at all, if something requires my attention elsewhere (I’m thinking a work or family-related emergency).

4. Sometimes it’s fun just to sit and watch. I’ve never really just sat back and watched at one of these. This might be a good thing to try.

5. Sometimes sharing the material online is fun, too. I’ve received a number of emails from folks saying they’ve found my notes helpful in the past, and I do appreciate having the opportunity to help others when possible.

6. There’s a livestream. The livestream is really handy and allows people to listen in as they go about their day.

So what say you all? Live-blog or not live-blog?

March’s top ten articles at Blogging Theologically

top-ten

Let’s take a trip back in time and check out the top ten posts in March:

  1. God Won’t Give You More Than You Can Handle (July 2009)
  2. God might call you to be ignored (March 2014)
  3. Memorizing God’s Word: Colossians (July 2013)
  4. Kindle deals for Christian readers (March 2014)
  5. Are Christians really free to smoke pot? (March 2014)
  6. God helps those who help themselves (July 2009)
  7. John Piper on Mark Driscoll & John MacArthur (May 2009)
  8. Church Buildings: They’re actually useful! (December 2009)
  9. Preaching and Pragmatism (July 2011)
  10. Ministry Idolatry (January 2011)

And just for fun, here’s a look at the next ten:

  1. Have the courage to apologize (March 2014)
  2. Where is Jesus Christ? (March 2014)
  3. The Storytelling God by Jared C. Wilson (March 2014)
  4. Jehovah Tsidkenu (March 2014)
  5. Four pieces of leadership “wisdom” you should totally ignore (February 2014)
  6. Where Is Jesus In The Old Testament? (June 2011)
  7. 4 things I liked and 3 I didn’t about the new Noah movie (March 2014)
  8. Being present, as Christians, with lost people (March 2014)
  9. A quick look at some new books (March 2014)
  10. Captivated by Thabiti Anyabwile (March 2014)

If you haven’t had a chance to already, I hope you’ll take a few minutes today to check out a few of these articles.

Links I like

How it’s all going to end

Sam Storms (it’s an oldie, but a goodie):

This work of the Spirit in restraining human sin is called “grace” because no one deserves it. That God inhibits their sin is an expression of mercy to those who deserve judgment. It is called “common” because it is universal. Both saved and unsaved, regenerate and unregenerate, are the recipients of this divine favor. It is not restricted to any one group of people and it does not necessarily lead to salvation.

When the Bible Is Hard to Understand

John Knight:

Like most of you, I’m just a guy in the pews. I have no formal theological education. I can’t read Greek or Hebrew. I have a full life with my family, my job, my church, and several other activities scattered within. But I wasn’t content to end with whatever I “thought” the passage meant. I wanted to understand what God meant by these hard texts and therefore, I pulled out study Bibles and commentaries and looked over sermons preached by my pastor and other trusted expositors.

Why you should never self-diagnose using the Internet

HT: 22 words (via Z)

Darren Aronofsky’s Noah

Greg Thornbury:

Only with the juxtaposition against radical depravity can mercy actually make sense. Failing this understanding, you cannot sustain Christian theism. Otherwise, mercy becomes weak, expected, and even demanded. Seeing Russell Crowe-as-Noah grit his teeth and war against real flesh-and-blood evil makes sin, a notion seemingly incredible to Hollywood, to be real. As a viewer, locked into the gaze of the film, you’re thinking, I’m with God, and this Noah guy. It makes the redemption and mercy theme of the film compelling, even if Aronofsky takes a slightly perverse (and admittedly extra-biblical) route to make the point. We grew up in a world that makes Noah nice. Noah is not nice.

4 Reasons I Still Prefer Books Over eBooks and A Note to Blogger Review Programs

Mike Leake:

Using my Kindle on my iPad is growing on me, I must confess. I’m reading more and more books that way. But I’m finding that these are mostly books that I read for sheer entertainment value. If I really want to chew on a book then reading it in electronic format is pretty much useless.

Today I am sharing four reasons why I still prefer actual hold-in-my-hand-and- smell-the-pages books over their computerized version. I also will add a note to publishers and blogger review programs.

February’s top ten articles at Blogging Theologically

top-ten

Let’s take a trip back in time and check out the top ten posts in February:

  1. God Won’t Give You More Than You Can Handle (July 2009)
  2. Three reasons to keep reading the Old Testament (February 2014)
  3. God helps those who help themselves (July 2009)
  4. Four pieces of leadership “wisdom” you should totally ignore (February 2014)
  5. Church Buildings: They’re actually useful! (December 2009)
  6. Preaching and Pragmatism (July 2011)
  7. Ministry Idolatry (January 2011)
  8. John Piper on Mark Driscoll & John MacArthur (May 2009)
  9. The universal disease of all mankind (February 2014)
  10. Romans 1-7 For You by Timothy Keller  (February 2014)

And just for fun, here’s a look at the next ten:

  1. Where Is Jesus In The Old Testament? (June 2011)
  2. Can you pray for us?  (February 2014)
  3. Your presuppositions shape your response (February 2014)
  4. 7 signs you’re reading a book by a prosperity preacher (January 2014)
  5. Invest by Sutton Turner (February 2014)
  6. A brief look at the 9Marks series  (February 2014)
  7. Leland Ryken wants to help you study The Pilgrim’s Progress (February 2014)
  8. A brand-new site (February 2014)
  9. The original Christian hipster (February 2014)
  10. Evangelism and the Sovereignty of God by J.I. Packer (February 2014)

If you haven’t had a chance to already, I hope you’ll take a few minutes today to check out a few of these articles.

Five things I’ve learned from five years of blogging

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So it’s been a couple years since I last wrote a state of the blog type piece and I figured I’m overdue, especially since five years ago today, in a moment of sheer madness and desperation, I hit the publish button on a WordPress blog. Five years later, I’m still hitting publish (and some days, it still feels like a bit of madness and desperation involved).

So in honor of the blog’s fifth anniversary, I thought I’d share five things I’ve learned along the way:

Controversy is boring. I’ve said it many, many times, but it’s worth repeating: controversy might get a lot of traffic, but it’s boring to write about. Honestly, I don’t know how the watchblogger types do it. Honestly, I think I’d go nuts if I only wrote about what stupid thing some yahoo who thinks too highly of himself did this week. Sometimes controversy is unavoidable, but only when it’s coming at you like a multi-car pileup on the highway. If you’ve got time to hit the brakes, do.

Breaks really, really matter. Fairly early on, I set August as the month where I’d take a break from blogging (it started as a week and expanded from there). Taking a break helps clear the head and give you fresh perspective—which, when you write daily, you really, really need.

Interacting with others is fun. Not every post has to be a 100 percent original thought. My favorite times are when I’m engaging with something I’ve read and working through the implications in my own life. This is one of my favorite (recent) examples. Whether it’s another blogger’s post, a news story or a passage from a book, this has been some of the most rewarding writing for me.

Encouraging spouses are the best. My wife is a big help around here. She regularly listens to me ramble on about an idea I’ve got, gives feedback when I’m working on a post, suggests topics to write on. Occasionally, she even writes something herself, too! If Emily weren’t supportive of what I’m doing, I’d probably have to quit.

Followers and stats don’t equal influence. Whether you’ve got 20 or 20,000 readers, five followers or 5000 on Twitter, or two friends or 2000 fans on Facebook, influence isn’t about numbers. Influence has far more to do with what’s happened as a result of what you’ve written, rather than how many times someone potentially saw it. Most of the time you never hear what’s come from it, but every so often you get a comment or an email. And when you get those little glimpses, it’s a great time to give thanks to God.

So those are a few things I’ve learned (and relearned) over the last five years of blogging. Thanks for making it fun, friends!

 

January’s top ten articles at Blogging Theologically

Let’s take a trip back in time and check out the top ten posts in January:

  1. 15 signs your church is growing in the right way (January 2014)
  2. 7 signs you’re reading a book by a prosperity preacher (January 2014)
  3. God Won’t Give You More Than You Can Handle (July 2009)
  4. Three things I’d like to see in the Christian blogosphere in 2014 (January 2014)
  5. Is church growth all about the pastor? (January 2014)
  6. A look at The Gospel Transformation Bible (January 2014)
  7. God helps those who help themselves (July 2009)
  8. The shocking secret to finding God’s will (January 2014)
  9. Ministry Idolatry (January 2011)
  10. Church Buildings: They’re actually useful! (December 2009)

And just for fun, here’s a look at the next ten:

  1. Preaching and Pragmatism (July 2011)
  2. John Piper on Mark Driscoll & John MacArthur (May 2009)
  3. Where Is Jesus In The Old Testament? (June 2011)
  4. 6 quotes Christians need to let lie fallow (January 2014)
  5. It’s not a cold—it’s cancer! (Janury 2014)
  6. 14 books I want to read in 2014 (and think you should too) (December 2013)
  7. You are not a Christian just because you like Jesus (January 2014)
  8. Jesus > Religion by Jefferson Bethke (January 2014)
  9. Gospel-Centered Teaching by Trevin Wax (January 2014)
  10. That awkward moment in kids ministry when… (January 2014)

If you haven’t had a chance to already, I hope you’ll take a few minutes today to check out a few of these articles.