My favorite books to review in 2014

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Recently, I shared some of my favorite books to read in 2014 (many of which I reviewed). Today, I want to share a few of my favorite books to review.

These are not all books I enjoyed, nor are they all books I’d recommend you read yourself. But all were books that challenged me in some way as I tried to figure out how to best review them, whether because of disagreements with the content or because the genre was something I’d never tackled before.

So, with that in mind, here are the reviews I most enjoyed writing in 2014:

Rising Above a Toxic Workplace by Gary Chapman, Paul White, and Harold Myra

Why’d it make the cut? Business books in general are pretty tough to review. And this one was especially tricky given the content of the book, and avoiding speaking ill of others.

You and Me Forever by Francis and Lisa Chan

Why’d it make the cut? This was fun to review simply because it wasn’t a typical marriage book—since it isn’t really a book about marriage.

Crash the Chatterbox by Steven Furtick

Why’d it make the cut? Because writing anything that remotely resembles a balanced review of a book by someone as polarizing as Furtick is nigh-on impossible. (Read the review at TGC.)

Why We’re Not Emergent by Kevin DeYoung and Ted Kluck.

Why’d it make the cut? Okay, this wasn’t a review in my traditional style. However, reading the book again after several years away from it, it was fun to see what would still be relevant in it today. Apparently, quite a bit.

Is it My Fault? by Justin and Lindsey Holcomb

Why’d it make the cut? There was a lot that hit close to home reading and reviewing this one, which made both a lot more challenging than I anticipated.

The Adam Quest by Tim Stafford

Why’d it make the cut? While last year’s Mapping the Origins Debate was a good—if a bit stuffy—take on the origins debate, this book was all about the people behind the views. We often leave out the human factor in these debates, but it is absolutely necessary if we intend to have meaningful discussion with those holding differing views.

Invest by Sutton Turner

Why’d it make the cut? In some ways, this was even harder to review than Driscoll’s A Call to Resurgence, the book that spurred the events that ultimately brought an end to Mars Hill Church. Why? Because it was, ultimately, a book about turning your senior pastor into a celebrity, rather than making much about Jesus.

The Gospel Transformation Bible

Why’d it make the cut? Because it’s a BIBLE.

Jesus > Religion by Jefferson Bethke

Why’d it make the cut? Bethke’s youth—both in age and experience in the faith—shines in the book, for better and worse. The entire time I read this book, and as I reviewed it, I couldn’t help but wonder if this was really the right time for him to have written this. It’s not bad, but his strongest ideas are heavily borrowed from others.

My favorite articles to write in 2014

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Good writers will admit that it takes a lot of effort to write—not to simply to write well, but to write at all. It’s actually a lot easier to not. And very often, we writer types tend to be our own worst critics… but even so, there’s always something we’ve written we genuinely like.

Today, I want to share some of my favorites written in the last year. These are articles representing some of the work I’m most happy with from the past year, although not necessarily the most read (though some of them are).

I hope you’ll give them a read if you haven’t already:

The day ISIS got a little closer to home

We often fail to realize how closely connected we all are. We look at the world we live in—specifically our North American context—and assume the way we live is “normal.” The persecution of Christians in Iraq and Syria is a powerful wake-up call for us, if for no other reason than it reminds us that persecution is actually normal for Christians. It’s not something we read about in our Bible and think, “Gosh, I’m glad things are so much better now.” For many believers in over 100 nations, that’s life: beatings, wrongful imprisonment, verbal abuse, and martyrdom.

Ministry Idolatry

This is actually an article that’s existed for several years, but a few months ago, I rewrote it from scratch. I like the new version a lot more:

If a friend falls, will we encourage people to pray for him and his family (which is right to do), as well as to pray for those he’s wronged (which is equally right and necessary, as Matt Redmond has reminded us)? This is hard in some ways, because it requires us to challenge the idol of our preconceived notions and also the idol of “credibility” (and the danger, again, as Redmond has pointed out, is when we fail to speak out about glaring abuses we actually lose that which we sought to keep).

7 signs you’re reading a book by a prosperity preacher

Not too long ago, my wife was feeling a bit down, and a super-nice lady whose kids go to the same school as our daughter gave her some books to encourage her. Funnily enough, they all happened to be prosperity theology books (which has led to some entertaining and positive discussion around the house).

Every so often we all stumble into prosperity theology, usually unwittingly. While occasionally you’ll get a nugget of helpful truth (in the same way that you’ll find some helpful things in your average self-help book), there’s a lot of goofiness which can make for a fun night of “Joel Osteen or Fortune Cookie.” So, how do you know if you’re reading a book written by a prosperity preacher? Here are seven signs.

If the gospel isn’t in it, should we be singing it?

So there’s a completely accurate report rumor going around that I’m pretty persnickety about music. Like, to the point that I have trouble singing most Sundays. This isn’t because there’s anything terrible with the music at our church—far from it, our church has a pretty robust music ministry (but thankfully no lasers or smoke machines)—it’s just I find myself thinking about the words we’re singing more often than not.

The reasons for this vary: sometimes it’s considering how those words line up with my own life at that moment. Other times, it’s contemplating whether or not the words are actually undeniably Christian, or if they’re just kind of feel-good gobbledygook.

Thankfully I am not alone in this.

How to talk when we talk about God

What kind of pronouns should we use when we talk about God?

We typically default to the masculine “He,” but should we?

Is there anything wrong with referring to God as “she”?

While the answer might seem obvious, it is worth considering. After all, as Christians, we want to speak of God in a way that is pleasing to Him. So, here are a few things to keep in mind when considering how to to talk when we talk about God.

160 of the most terrifying words I’ve ever read

The fact that we can so easily deceive ourselves about the state of our souls. That we can say the “right” words, have a good marriage, go to church regularly—that we can be the model “good” Christian—and only be kidding ourselves. That what we think of as fruit may not be fruit at all.

“But where is the Holy Ghost to be seen in their lives?” 

3 passages I want to preach (but have been afraid to)

By the way, this summer I got over my fear and preached two of these passages:

I’m going to let you in on a not-so-secret secret: preaching is really hard. It’s a task that can (or should) make even the most confident man a little weak in the knees. One of the things that’s always freaked me out has been trying to choose the right passage to preach… What if it’s the “wrong” message for the church, or what if I do injustice to the text? And let’s face it, some texts are significantly harder to teach than others.

Here’s a look at three books I want to preach, but have been afraid to.

Would Paul have used video? Here’s a better question…

The question of whether or not Paul would use video is an important one, but I wonder if it might also be the wrong one.

Would Paul use video to share the gospel? Probably, sure. But, more importantly, what would he use it for?

The preposterous inconsistency of secular sexual ethics

…who draws the line when it comes to sexual ethics in the postmodern secular worldview? Is it purely individual? Is it a constantly moving target? Is the line drawn, as in some views, based on how “good” the fruit appears to be? In the end, it comes down to all sexual preferences being all equally fine, unless they’re too icky or inconvenient for us.

Christian, don’t begrudgingly affirm God’s Word

Public personalities like these aren’t alone in doing the dance. At some point or another we all do it. And as I’ve watched it happen (and occasionally been caught in it myself) time and again, one of the inevitable pieces of fallout is we wind up just having to come out and say what we were trying to not say.

This almost begrudging acceptance of the truth—we really do have to say what the Bible says.

See what made the cut in years past:

My favorite articles to write in 2013

November’s top ten articles at Blogging Theologically

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Let’s take a trip back in time and check out the top ten posts in November:

  1. God Won’t Give You More Than You Can Handle (July 2009)
  2. Write More Better: a new eBook on writing well (November 2014)
  3. Seven books Christian women should read (November 2014)
  4. Five books to read near Christmas
  5. God helps those who help themselves (July 2009)
  6. Ministry Idolatry (January 2011/rewritten in September 2014)
  7. Church Buildings: They’re actually useful! (December 2009)
  8. Preaching and Pragmatism (July 2011)
  9. 7 signs you’re reading a book by a prosperity preacher (January 2014)
  10. My five favorite podcasts (November 2014)

And just for fun, here’s a look at the next ten:

  1. John Piper on Mark Driscoll & John MacArthur (May 2009)
  2. Choosing a New Preaching Bible (November 2011)
  3. Black Friday + Cyber Monday deals for the Christian guy and gal (November 2014)
  4. A look at Logos 6 (October 2014)
  5. 160 of the most terrifying words I’ve ever read (May 2014)
  6. My blogging toolkit (November 2014)
  7. Why I Believe Amillennialism by Matthew Svoboda (July 2010)
  8. Why don’t they report it? (November 2014)
  9. 5 books on a subject you’re probably scared to look at (April 2013)
  10. Where Is Jesus In The Old Testament? (June 2011)

If you haven’t had a chance to already, I hope you’ll take a few minutes today to check out a few of these articles.

October’s top ten articles at Blogging Theologically

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Let’s take a trip back in time and check out the top ten posts in October:

  1. God Won’t Give You More Than You Can Handle (July 2009)
  2. The preposterous inconsistency of secular sexual ethics (October 2014)
  3. Five fiction books you should read (October 2014)
  4. Five opportunities to glorify God in Mark Driscoll’s resignation (October 2014)
  5. Fame does not care for the humble (October 2014)
  6. What do the attacks in Ottawa mean for us? (October 2014)
  7. God helps those who help themselves (July 2009)
  8. Ministry Idolatry (January 2011/rewritten in September 2014)
  9. Preaching and Pragmatism (July 2011)
  10. Church Buildings: They’re actually useful! (December 2009)

And just for fun, here’s a look at the next ten:

  1. 6 quotes Christians need to let lie fallow (January 2014)
  2. John Piper on Mark Driscoll & John MacArthur (May 2009)
  3. Why is it so tempting to toss the Bible? (October 2014)
  4. You and Me Forever (October 2014)
  5. Christian, don’t begrudgingly affirm God’s Word (October 2014)
  6. A look at Logos 6 (October 2014)
  7. Choosing a New Preaching Bible (November 2011)
  8. New and noteworthy books (October 2014)
  9. What does the Bible say about worship? (March 2013)
  10. Write more better: read! (October 2014)

If you haven’t had a chance to already, I hope you’ll take a few minutes today to check out a few of these articles.

Don’t seek what you’re not willing to lose

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There’s a real danger to platform building, as anyone who has paid the slightest amount of attention to the scandals that routinely rock churches in North America will tell you. And it almost always winds up being a variation on the same theme: someone starts believing his or her own press.

Despite building a platform for the sake of the gospel, the platform inevitably becomes more and more about us.

And the moment that happens, we’ve already lost it. We see this when celebrity pastors hire PR firms, sure, but none of us are immune. When blog stats are lower than we’d like, or we lose follower on social media, or people simply aren’t as into us as they used to be… When it’s about us, these things destroy us. When it’s about Jesus, it doesn’t matter quite so much.

September’s top ten articles at Blogging Theologically

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Let’s take a trip back in time and check out the top ten posts in September:

  1. The day ISIS got a little closer to home (September 2014)
  2. God Won’t Give You More Than You Can Handle (July 2009)
  3. Four and a half books I shouldn’t have read as a new Christian (May 2014)
  4. Seven books I abandoned (September 2014)
  5. Is church growth all about the pastor? (January 2014)
  6. He Descended into… Hell? (January 2012)
  7. 15 signs your church is growing in the right way (January 2014)
  8. 5 books every new Christian should read (May 2014)
  9. Ministry Idolatry (January 2011/revamped September 2014)
  10. Seven books I’m reading this fall (September 2014)

And just for fun, here’s a look at the next ten:

  1. Invest by Sutton Turner (February 2014)
  2. Preaching and Pragmatism (July 2011)
  3. Church Buildings: They’re actually useful! (December 2009)
  4. God helps those who help themselves (July 2009)
  5. John Piper on Mark Driscoll & John MacArthur (May 2009)
  6. 3 reasons why some churches don’t grow (that you don’t usually hear) (January 2013)
  7. What we get wrong about church discipline (September 2014)
  8. New and noteworthy books (September 2014)
  9. Three lifestyle changes we are making (September 2014)
  10. Choosing a New Preaching Bible (November 2011)

If you haven’t had a chance to already, I hope you’ll take a few minutes today to check out a few of these articles.

Links I like

Kindle deals for Christian readers

Only a couple of new ones that I’m aware of today, both by Mark Sayers: Facing Leviathan and The Road Trip that Changed the World ($4.99 each).

Blogs Gone Cold

Hannah Anderson, Courtney Reissig, and Megan Hill speak on the tendency for Christian blogs written by women to go cold.

Is Divorce Equivalent to Homosexuality?

Russell Moore:

This week my denomination, through its executive committee, voted to “disfellowship” a congregation in California that has acted to affirm same-sex sexual relationships. This sad but necessary move is hardly surprising, since this network of churches shares a Christian sexual ethic with all orthodox Christians of every denomination for 2,000 years. One of the arguments made by some, though, is that this is hypocritical since so many ministers in our tradition marry people who have been previously divorced.

A novel Jared Wilson thinks every Christian should read

The final part of Justin Taylor’s excellent series. And speaking of Justin…

Justin Taylor (sorta) interviews Dane Ortlund

If I ever get to write a book for Crossway, I’m going to insist an interview like this is part of the deal:

A Long Line of Leaving Our Comfort Zone

Ben Connelly:

My three-year-old Charlotte woke up at 4am last night. When the babysitters had put her to bed, they hadn’t flipped on her “night-night light.” A train horn in the blackness startled her to tears. When I plugged in the tiny bulb, soft yellow light engulfed the room. The darkness was gone and she cuddled back to sleep. One of the most impacting facts I’ve ever learned is that physical light always goes into darkness; scientifically, darkness never comes to light. Darkness cannot overcome a candle; it must wait for the flame to flicker out. But when you flip a light switch, beams instantly fill the blackness. If we may spiritualize the image a bit, light goes into—and pushes back—darkness.

The spin of Patriarchy

This week’s episode of the Mortification of Spin is well worth listening to.

Links I like

Kindle deals for Christian readers

And although it’s not on sale, you’d do well to pre-order David Murray’s upcoming book, The Happy Christian: Ten Ways to Be a Joyful Believer in a Gloomy World.

It’s Personal. Don’t You Ever Forget it.

Erik Raymond:

When you consider this love, think also of the fact that no one truly knows what was required like Christ. Therefore, he loves most and best of all. How so? Well, no one knows the depths of God’s holiness and righteousness like Christ. He knows what is required. He knows this by virtue of his divine omniscience but also his human experience. He, after all, is the one to say, “I glorified you on earth, having accomplished the work that you gave me to do.” (Jn. 17.4) In other words, “I have magnified your name Father; I have considered your holiness and not wavered a moment. Everything I have done is perfectly adorning of your holiness.”

Get Blood Work in today’s $5 Friday at Ligonier.org

Today you can get Blood Work: How the Blood of Christ Accomplishes Our Salvation by Anthony Carter (hardcover) for only $5 in today’s $5 Friday sale at Ligonier.org. Other items on sale:

  • Believing God teaching series by R.C. Sproul Jr (DVD)
  • The Faith Shaped Life by Ian Hamilton (paperback)
  • Holy, Holy, Holy: Proclaiming the Perfections of God (ePub)

$5 Friday ends tonight at 11:59:59 PM Eastern.

Why You Shouldn’t Give Up On The Church

Barnabas Piper:

Many people like me, who grew up immersed in church, have given up on it. Church is archaic, domineering, impersonal, hypocritical, irrelevant, contentious, petty, boring, and stale. It’s institutional instead of authentic and religious but not relational they say. I have seen all this in church and can agree that each accusation is true in instances. A PK sees all this up close and far too personally and feels each fault even more intensely. It really is enough to make one want to bail on church.

And I had my chance. Despite growing up steeped in sound Bible teaching and a loving context, I grew up empty in my soul. I believed but didn’t fully believe. I obeyed but kept parts of my life for myself, bits of dishonesty and secrecy. I knew Jesus and knew He was the only way to be saved from my sin, but I didn’t give my life to Him. In the end it blew up in my face and I was faced with the decision: stay in church and work through my mess or leave and be free. I stayed.

A bad reason to review a book

Nate is bang on.

When You’re Truly Broken Over Sin

Vermon Pierre:

Repentance is hard because pridefulness is easy. We don’t want to admit when we have sinned, and thus we have trouble truly confessing and then repenting of sin. How often have the words Yes, but . . . entered your thoughts when you have been confronted over sin?

Sin, however, cannot be dealt with in any other way but head on, without any self-justifying excuses. We need to address it directly, with full honesty and little reservation, if we are to truly kill it.

What does accountability look like for Christian bloggers?

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One of the great dangers of the Internet is also one of its great strengths: the ability to communicate to a (potentially) large group of people with few (if any) barriers. While much good can come from this, it also represents a great risk to those who write if we don’t have any sort of accountability.

As Christians, we understand that we don’t live our lives in isolation. We live in mutual submission to one another. So, what does this look like for Christian bloggers—or at least, this one? Here are three forms of accountability I have in place:

1. The elders of our church. I believe one of the most dangerous places for a Christian to be is outside of the authority of their local church (insomuch as they are modelling Christlikeness in exercising it). So, when we joined our church, one of the first requests I made of our elders was for them to have oversight over this blog.

This doesn’t mean they spend all their time reading this blog since they have much more important things to do. But it does mean they’re aware of what’s going on. So, if they see something they’re concerned about in a post, they can ask me to clarify or remove it, depending on the degree of concern. If they are see an unhealthy pattern in my writing (for example, unnecessarily chasing controversy or using words sinfully), they can ask me to either take a hiatus or stop altogether. And to date, I can count the number of times I’ve had a concern raised on one hand.

2. My wife. Emily actually reads or hears almost every post I write. She’s a good gauge for whether or not the content is actually helpful, and because she is slightly more in touch with people’s feelings, she can give me a better sense of a reader’s response. The number of times she’s asked me to rewrite something or not publish cannot be counted; the number is far too great.

3. Trusted fellow bloggers. There are a few fellow bloggers I seek out feedback from on a semi-regular basis, particularly when writing on a sensitive subject. If, for example, I’m writing a critical review (such as this one), or addressing a controversial topic or person, a number of people will almost certainly have read the post before it ever gets published. This group of writers has given me a great deal of sharpening critique, pushed me to drop certain arguments or add new ones, and, every so often, let me know when something’s not worth writing about at all.

That, in a nutshell is what accountability looks like for me. Mind blowing? Probably not. Helpful? You bet.

August’s top ten articles at Blogging Theologically

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Let’s take a trip back in time and check out the top ten posts in August:

  1. Being all about Jesus: thoughts on Mark Driscoll, anger, forgiveness and grace (August 2014)
  2. John Piper on Mark Driscoll & John MacArthur (May 2009)
  3. When is saving repentance truly seen? (August 2014)
  4. I’m giving away a personal library! (August 2014)
  5. God Won’t Give You More Than You Can Handle (July 2009)
  6. Kindle deals for Christian readers (August 2014)
  7. Five books every Christian should read on prayer (August 2014)
  8. Ministry Idolatry (January 2011)
  9. Preaching and Pragmatism (July 2011)
  10. Five biographies you (and I) should read (August 2014)

And just for fun, here’s a look at the next ten:

  1. Church Buildings: They’re actually useful! (December 2009)
  2. Seven books to read on Christianity and homosexuality (August 2014)
  3. God helps those who help themselves (July 2009)
  4. Everything hidden will be revealed (August 2014)
  5. 5 words on extemporaneous preaching (July 2014)
  6. Accidental double agents in the pulpit (August 2014)
  7. 16 timely quotes from Why We’re Not Emergent (August 2014)
  8. Choosing a New Preaching Bible (November 2011)
  9. Let’s do some catalytic visioneering… and stuff! Because we’re leaders! (August 2014)
  10. What does the Bible say about worship? (March 2013)

If you haven’t had a chance to already, I hope you’ll take a few minutes today to check out a few of these articles.

July’s top ten articles at Blogging Theologically

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Let’s take a trip back in time and check out the top ten posts in July:

  1. God Won’t Give You More Than You Can Handle (July 2009)
  2. Logos giveaway: The Zondervan Theology Collection (July 2014)
  3. Church Buildings: They’re actually useful! (December 2009)
  4. Ministry Idolatry (January 2011)
  5. Preaching and Pragmatism (July 2011)
  6. How to share the Gospel with someone who thinks all Christians are hypocrites (July 2014)
  7. What might Jesus say if He visited your small group? (July 2014)
  8. God’s Word is our ultimatum (July 2014)
  9. God helps those who help themselves (July 2009)
  10. Kindle deals for Christian readers (July 2014)

And just for fun, here’s a look at the next ten:

  1. Lapel clipper or boy bander? (July 2014)
  2. Five books I’m (probably) not proposing (July 2014)
  3. John Piper on Mark Driscoll & John MacArthur (May 2009)
  4. New and noteworthy books (July 2014)
  5. Life and death in marriage (July 2014)
  6. Every open door isn’t meant to be walked through (July 2014)
  7. Sola boot strapa (July 2014)
  8. I want a patriotic church (July 2014)
  9. Where Is Jesus In The Old Testament? (June 2011)
  10. Sensing Jesus (February 2013)

If you haven’t had a chance to already, I hope you’ll take a few minutes today to check out a few of these articles.

Links I like

I am Ryland

This is so, so good:

I have been shying away from highly controversial topics on this blog recently because I just couldn’t take the drama that naturally associates with it. But I keep hearing the story of Ryland, a child who was born a female, whose parents have transitioned her to male at 5 years old. You can see the full story HERE, but in short, because their daughter identified herself as a boy, and liked “boy” things as opposed to “girl” things, they cut off her hair, bought her “boy” clothes, and have begun telling her, and others, that she is a boy.

I have no degree in early childhood development, nor have I studied psychology. I didn’t even graduate from College.

I am also not here to pass judgement on Ryland’s parents. I believe that they are doing what they believe to be the most loving thing for their child. I’m simply sharing my story because I see so much of my 5-year-old self in this child.

Evangelicals who aren’t evangelicals

Thomas Kidd:

I agree with Swaim [who reviewed Steven Miller’s The Age of Evangelicalism in the Wall Street Journal] that the term evangelical, as used in the media, obscures fundamental differences between those lumped together as people who “feel strongly about their faith.” There are at least four types of Christians who often get cast as evangelicals who really are not evangelicals, if that term has any meaning.

How long does it take to read each book of the Bible?

Helpful chart from Desiring God. Be sure to read the rest of the article, too.

Exodus: Gods and Kings

The latest Hollywood Bible movie, this time starring Batman as Moses:

Should be interesting, at a minimum.

The click-baitiest click bait you ever did click

Mike Leake reminds us of the power of a good title.

8 Witnesses to Jesus as the Son of God and Messiah

Richard Phillips:

Witnesses are essential in establishing any claim to fact. When a news station wants to report an amazing event, it interviews eyewitnesses. We accept the reports of credible witnesses, especially when there are a number of them who agree. The same principle guides our legal system. When credible witnesses testify to an event, we are morally bound to accept what they say as true. In like manner, John’s Gospel presents us with such witnesses to Christ. Leon Morris writes, “[John] is insistent that there is good evidence for the things he sets down. Witness establishes truth.” This emphasis on the validity of witnesses ought to inform our own presentation of the gospel.

What witnesses does John present? Let me list eight of them.

In Praise of the Quiet Time

Megan Hill:

Recently I read “Why I Don’t Pray or Study the Bible (Much),” a Patheos blog post by Ellen Painter Dollar. She recounts how her time in an evangelical college fellowship was her first exposure to the discipline of daily Bible reading and prayer.… Some of Dollar’s skepticism about prayer and Scripture-study comes from her underlying assumptions about the nature of both. I believe the Bible is complete truth, God’s perfect revelation of himself, and essential for a Christian’s life and godliness. Likewise, I have a high view of prayer as one of God’s primary means for communion with his children, for glorifying himself, and for accomplishing his purposes.

June’s top ten articles at Blogging Theologically

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Let’s take a trip back in time and check out the top ten posts in June:

  1. God Won’t Give You More Than You Can Handle (July 2009)
  2. Preaching and Pragmatism (July 2011)
  3. Church Buildings: They’re actually useful! (December 2009)
  4. Ministry Idolatry (January 2011)
  5. Seven books I’m planning to read this summer (June 2014)
  6. If the gospel isn’t in it, should we be singing it? (June 2014)
  7. God helps those who help themselves (July 2009)
  8. John Piper on Mark Driscoll & John MacArthur (May 2009)
  9. 3 passages I want to preach (but have been afraid to) (June 2014)
  10. Why I’m thankful for the freedom to disagree (June 2014)

And just for fun, here’s a look at the next ten:

  1. Where Is Jesus In The Old Testament? (June 2011)
  2. Why am I thinking about getting an education (again)? (June 2014)
  3. 3 reasons why some churches don’t grow (that you don’t usually hear) (January 2013)
  4. The Gospel (June 2014)
  5. Should every Christian be in a small group? Yep! (June 2014)
  6. The secret of the Christian’s power (June 2014)
  7. Why I won’t read your book on visiting Heaven (January 2013)
  8. 5 books every new Christian should read (May 2014)
  9. What should I review? (June 2014)
  10. Think about what you read (June 2014)

If you haven’t had a chance to already, I hope you’ll take a few minutes today to check out a few of these articles.

Meet some of this summer’s guest bloggers

Every year, I’ve taken some time off during the summer from blogging. It’s a terrific time to unplug, unwind, catch up on my other projects, and give you the chance to read some really great content from a number of different voices.

In year’s past, I’ve put out an open call to readers, but this year I did something a little different and invited a number of friends to join in the fun. Some of these folks are undoubtedly very familiar to readers both here and in the Christian blogosphere in general. Others are new faces you’ll want to get to know.

Here are a few people you’ll be reading some fantastic stuff from in July:

  • Michael Kelley, author of Boring and Wednesdays Were Pretty Normal
  • Rob Tims, author of Southern Fried Faith and discipleship strategist at LifeWay
  • Brandon Hiltibidal, discipleship strategist at LifeWay
  • Ben Reed, author of Starting Small: The Ultimate Small Group Blueprint, and small groups pastor at Long Hollow Baptist Church
  • Amber Van Schooneveld, author of Hope Lives, and one of my partners in crime at Compassion Canada
  • Jacob Abshire, author of Forgiveness and Faith, and founder of Resolute Creative
  • Sarah Van Beveren, blogger and fellow Canadian
  • Ben Riggs of Apex Community Church in Kettering, Ohio
  • Dave Jenkins, director of Servants of Grace

And that’s just a few. Don’t surprised to see more names pop up over the next while.

What will I be doing while I’m away? Among other things, our family will be spending a week in the land of spotty wi-fi (a cottage not too far away from Campbellford, Ontario), catching up on some reading, and, hopefully, making some headway on a couple of projects I’ve let linger for far too long. (Prayer would be appreciated for that.)

Looking forward to being back soon!