Links I like

5 Reasons Not to Give Up on the Marriage Debate

Kevin DeYoung:

But every once in awhile—maybe one day a week, probably on Sundays—I can’t help but hold out hope for traditional marriage. What if “being on the wrong side of history” is more of a progressive ideology than a foregone conclusion? What if our cultural development is not inexorably locked into either a pattern of secularization and sexual liberation? What if the building block of every successful civilization cannot be redefined as easily as some imagine? Are there any reasons to think traditional marriage can make a comeback?

Let me suggest five.

Save on Piper’s latest at Westminster Books

As you may recall, the other day I reviewed John Piper’s latest book, Five Points: Towards a Deeper Experience of God’s GraceUntil 11/19, Westminster Books is offering this excellent little book for $4.50 (50 percent off the cover price). You can also purchase the book as part of a bundle featuring the following titles:

  • Five Points
  • Finally Alive
  • God is the Gospel
  • A Hunger for God

Don’t be a hater

He Opened His Mouth

Bill Mounce:

So does the phrase “to open one’s mouth” have any meaning, or is it so redundant that it should be skipped in translation? I think that there is enough of a pattern to show that it was a way of adding solemnity to what was to be said. Carson comments that it reflects OT roots and “is used in solemn or revelatory contexts.”

Is Your Skin Thick or Dead?

Barnabas Piper:

I have thick skin. It is a blessing. I don’t know whether it is genetic or developed, nature or nurture. Likely it’s some of both. And my three older brothers deserve some thanks for their contributions to thickening it up too. Having thick skin means that I can write and publish without fearing the inevitable criticism. I can speak, converse, hold a point of view and not worry about the flak I will take for my opinions. It means I don’t take too much stuff personally so when slights or criticism come I don’t immediately turn on or draw away from the critic. Thick skin is a real benefit as a writer, an employee, and as a family man. And just as a human in a hurtful world.

Get serious about your studies: how should you read the Bible?

Get-Serious-About-Your-Studies

This might seem like a strange subject to bring up at the (possible) end of a series, but it’s an important one.

A great deal of the discussion surrounding getting serious about our studies has been focused on different tools and learning aids—study Bibles, systematic theologies and technology. There’s so much I’ve not touched on (yet) including commentaries, original languages (although I’ve dealt with that elsewhere), Bible dictionaries and encyclopedias…

But there’s one thing I’d be totally remiss if I didn’t address this critical question:

How should you read your Bible?

What I’m talking about here is the science of hermeneutics, which is a big fancy word for “rules and principles for reading the Bible.” Whether we realize it or not, we do this every time we pick up our Bible—and the rules and principles we hold to drastically affect what we believe the Bible says. For example:

  • Whether you believe pastoral ministry is for men only or is open to women as well stems from the interpretive decisions you make.
  • How you approach the “God-hates-yet-loves-sinners” paradox is heavily influenced by your hermeneutical approach.1
  • How you understand the world to have come into being and how this world will end is drastically affected by the principles you use for interpreting the text.

I could go on with numerous examples, but I trust you get the drift. Hermeneutics really, really matter—we all use rules and principles of interpretation so we are obliged to do our best to make sure the rules we use are sound. [Read more…]

New E-Book: Lessons from Nehemiah

Artwork © Justin Gerard. Used with permission.

Nehemiah is a book that has always interested me. The story of a Jewish servant, the cupbearer to King Artaxerxes, who asks the king to be released from his position so he can rebuild the walls of Jerusalem—and he wants the king to pay for it!

Truly, he has what one pastor calls “audacious faith.”

As I read through this great Old Testament book, I found I had pages and pages of notes covering the lessons I was learning. Those notes turned into the Lessons from Nehemiah series that was first published online in March, 2009 and now make up the content of this small book.

Best of all, it’s free for you to download and share with your friends and family!

You can also read and share it on Scribd.

This wasn’t an easy series to write. As it almost certainly should, writing Lessons from Nehemiah forced me to confront a great number of sins in my life, not the least of which being my attitude to authority and my stubbornness in leaving things in the care of our Sovereign Lord.

And as anyone who knows me will tell you, I continue to struggle in these areas. But I hope I’ve made progress.

Having said all that, Lessons from Nehemiah continues to be one of my favorite series of essays—and one I come back to periodically to remind myself of what God has taught me through His written Word.

I hope it’s a benefit to you as well.