Around the Interweb (12/20)

The Many Ways of Destroying the Church

The ways of destroying the church are many and colorful.  Raw factionalism will do it.  Rank heresy will do it.  Taking your eyes off the cross and letting other, more peripheral matters dominate the agenda will do it–admittedly more slowly than frank heresy, but just as effectively over the long haul.  Building the church with superficial ‘conversions’ and wonderful programs that rarely bring people into a deepening knowledge of the living God will do it.  Entertaining people to death but never fostering the beauty of holiness or the centrality of self-crucifying love will build an assembling of religious people, but it will destroy the church of the living God.  Gossip, prayerlessness, bitterness, sustained biblical illiteracy, self-promotion, materialism–all of these things, and many more, can destroy a church.  And to do so is dangerous: ‘If anyone destroys God’s temple, God will destroy him; for God’s temple is sacred, and you are that temple (1 Cor. 3:17).  It is a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the living God.

D.A. Carson, The Cross and Christian Ministry: Leadership Lessons from 1 Corinthians (Grand Rapids: Baker, 1993), 83-84.

HT: Timmy Brister


In other news

5 things the Church can learn from the fall of Myspace

Tim Keller on dealing with harsh criticism

Russell Moore—Avatar: Rambo in Reverse

An update on Pastor Matt Chandler’s condition


In case you missed it

Here are a few of this week’s notable posts:

A review of Alexander Strauch’s Leading with Love 

Vintage Jesus is Vintage Driscoll—a review of the Vintage Jesus DVD Curriculum

This is War (a Christmas Carol from Dustin Kensrue)

A biographical sketch of Charles Wesley

This is War (A Christmas Carol)

Last Christmas, Dustin Kensrue of Thrice released a Christmas album, This Good Night is Still Everywhere. A particularly thought provoking song on the record is called This is War. Kensrue describes it as a different take on the Christmas story—God declaring war on sin, death and Satan. In a way, it’s seeing Jesus’ incarnation for what it really was.

During the introduction to the video, he reminds us that Christmas is a unique opportunity for us, as Christians, to talk about things that are otherwise considered taboo in our society.

Like Jesus.

Even if you don’t believe what Christians would claim about Him, you have to step back and ask why is this man the most famous person who ever lived? This Galilean peasant who was killed in the most dishonoring and awful of ways. Why still is he the person that a large part of the world still thinks is God in Flesh and why is his impact so large?

Enjoy the video. The song is tremendous:

You can also watch the video without the intro here:

If you’re looking for some great Christmas music, buy the album at iTunes and Amazon.

HT: Ransom.tv