Eschatology Matters (Even if We Don’t Want it To)

Does anyone else think charts and graphs when they hear "eschatology"?

Eschatology is a weird thing (and a weird word). Too often when I think of the end times, immediately images of complicated charts and graphs (possibly drawn in crayon) and/or the thought of being “left behind” with an earnest Kirk Cameron come to mind…

What about you?

Does the idea make you want to curl up into the fetal position?

When people talk about the Rapture, are you secretly hoping they’ll just be raptured right then? (To borrow a joke.)

I dont’t have an eschatological position locked yet. I’ve not done enough study.

But I need to.

Last week, C.J. Mahaney posted an excerpt of Jeff Purswell’s closing message to the Next 2010 conference, reminding us that eschatology isn’t something to be ignored, but rather it’s the crown of our theology. Purswell puts it this way:

Eschatology is not intended to be an add-on to your theology. In many ways eschatology is the crown of theology. It answers questions that other doctrines raise.

And so we believe in God’s good providence. Where is God’s providence leading? We know Jesus paid for our sin, and he’s helping us battle that sin. But how will sin finally be overcome? We know that Jesus triumphed on the cross. What will it look like when he finally triumphs over all things? How will the Holy Spirit finish his work in us? What will the church ultimately look like?

Eschatology answers all these questions. If your eschatology is unformed, your doctrine—your beliefs—will be unformed as well. [Read more...]

Eschatology: My Perspective by Matthew Svoboda

Amillenials aren't fans of charts

This should be a pretty fun and interesting series. I’ve studied Eschatology quote extensively over the last few years. I have read 3 full commentaries on the book of Revelation from 3 different perspectives, I have read countless books and articles, and I have listened to over 30 hours of lectures. On top of that I did an 8 week series for my small group in which I merely did an exegesis of what I feel are 8 of the more important passages on this issue. I say all of that to tell you, I am no expert. I have studied hard, given myself a ton of headaches, and have gained a lot of joy out of my time of studying Eschatology.

While some of you loonies think Eschatology is in the holy triumphant of doctrines along with the Trinity and Justification by Faith Alone, most of us realize this is an issue that we can disagree and still have the deepest forms of Christian intimacy with one another. Therefore, I am happy to interact with all of you on this post, but as soon as you start acting like a 15 year old brat I will simply ignore you, whether or not you are making good points. I am thankful to Aaron for asking me to write a post for his blog… He is a friend of mine so let’s make this as edifying and enjoyable for all of us as possible!

This is a topic that some spend way too much time on and in which others don’t devote enough time thinking, “we’ll never figure it out until Jesus comes back anyway.” You “Panmillennials” need to man up and engage Scripture on this issue! God had it written in his word for a reason. Study it until you become convinced in your own mind what it teaches.

I grew up Dispensational… Not by conviction, but by default. I thought every Christian believed what the great Tim LaHaye taught us. He was a legend in my Southern Baptist Church. Heck, he is a legend in 90% of the United States. When I moved to the Midwest I was hoping he wasn’t as popular he as he is in the South, well, he is. When I went to Bible College (Boyce), I was sitting in Theology III and we arrived at Eschatology. I had never studied it much, but I did know what Scripture taught in regards to the “key events” of the End Times. My professor started to summarize the major views- he then said a word that forever changed my life (yes, I’m being a little dramatic, but it did change how I view the Scriptures and relate to the world around me)—Amillennialism. When he described it with a preface of “not many people believe this anymore” I was a little taken back, but I soon realize he merely meant not many Baptists believe this anymore. [Read more...]