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The writing on the (bathroom) wall

Peter Jones offers some brief commentary on “gender-open” washrooms and worldview.

The Loss of Pastoral Credibility

Alastair Roberts:

On the Internet, one soon discovers that many respected church leaders are quite unable to deal directly with opposing viewpoints. In fact, many of them can’t even manage meaningful engagement with other voices. Their tweets may be entirely one-way conversations. They talk at their audiences. They can talk about other voices, but fail to talk to them, let alone with them. Their representations of opposing viewpoints reveal little direct exposure to the viewpoints in question. They may talk about ‘postmodernism’, but one has good reason to believe that they have never read any postmodern philosopher. They make bold generalizations about ‘feminism’, but you can be pretty certain that they don’t know their Butler from their Greer or their Irigaray. When they are actually exposed to an intelligent and informed critic, they reveal themselves to be reactive and ignorant. Their views are quite incapable of withstanding the stress-testing of disputation.

Get God Alone in today’s $5 Friday at Ligonier.org

Today you can get R.C. Sproul’s God Alone teaching series (audio and video download) for only $5 in today’s $5 Friday sale at Ligonier.org. Other items on sale:

  • Believing God by R.C. Sproul Jr. (ePub & Mobi)
  • Gospel Wakefulness by Jared Wilson (ePub)
  • Reformation Profiles teaching series by Stephen Nichols (audio and video download)

$5 Friday ends tonight at 11:59:59 PM Eastern.

The Next Chapter for Christian Publishing

Karen E Yates:

Earlier this month, renowned Christian author Philip Yancey said Farewell to the Golden Age of Christian publishing, leaving authors and readers concerned over the future of the industry. One author shared, “This is why I’m re-evaluating whether I want to be a writer anymore.” Another said, “This is just depressing.”

Working with my family’s Christian literary agency and law firm, Yates & Yates, I’ve witnessed some of the obstacles and opportunities in today’s ever-changing book market. While the industry looks different in the 21st century, many authors who have adapted to the new era find Christian publishing remains alive and well.

The Mark of the Beast – What Does the Bible Say?

This is a good introduction to this subject.

Free Logos book of the month

This month’s free book from Logos Bible Software is Creation and Fall, volume three in their Dietrich Bonhoeffer Works collection. You can also get volume seven in the series, Fiction from Tegel Prison, for an additional 99¢.

Bring Back the Holy Kiss

Megan Hill:

We might be tempted to think of the holy kiss as a practice for a particular first-century culture, too fraught with issues for our day. But this imperative covers the wide diversity of the New Testament church. Paul commands it, and Peter commands it, too. It is required of the Jewish-background diaspora recipients of Peter’s epistle, and also of the Roman and Thessalonian churches—bodies largely composed of Gentile converts. Twice, the holy kiss is commanded for the Corinthian church, a church so beleaguered by sexual impropriety that you’d think the apostle Paul would ban touch altogether.

Links I like

links i like

The Evangelical War on Contraception

Matthew Lee Anderson:

If you haven’t heard, evangelicals are currently campaigning against contraception.

Oh, you haven’t? Well, I can’t blame you. After all, it was only two years ago when a evangelical theologian seriously proposed that churches should give out contraception to single Christians because that supposedly reduces abortions and evangelical attendees responded with a collective, “Um, sure, why not?!”

Desiring God Conference for Pastors

The Desiring God 2014 Conference for Pastors starts today. If, like me, you’re at home instead of in Minneapolis, you can watch live online at desiringgod.org/live.

Legalistic Relativists

R.C. Sproul Jr:

The appeal of ethical relativism is rather plain to see. If there is no right and wrong then I can’t be convicted of any wrong. Ethical relativism allows me to write my own law, to edit on the fly, to finish “I may do this . . .” with an unassailable “. . . because I want to.” Desire becomes its own justification. My will becomes my law.

This appeal, however, soon enough begins to dissipate if we have any interest at all in being coherent, consistent in our thinking. We quickly turn, “I may do this, because I want to” into “You may not do that, because I want to do this.” Consider, just as an example, sexual perversion. The problem, morally speaking, with sexual perversion is that it is an abomination to God. Ethical relativism, of course, bars God from the conversation. Therefore there is no reason by which we might condemn the practice. There is, to these folks, no transcendent moral standard by which we are all bound. We can do what we want, no matter how perverse. Which means, doesn’t it, that I can call sexual perversion an abomination to God? What, after all, is to stop me?

Free stuff for book lovers

Christian Audio’s free audiobook of the month is When Helping Hurts by Steve Corbett and Brian Fikkert. This is well worth the free. Ligonier has also made The Prayer of the Lord by R.C. Sproul free until Feb. 28. Finally, the Logos edition of Biblical Theology in the Life of the Church by Michael Lawrence is free until the end of February. Enjoy!

This looks fun!

In April, the next big superhero movie, Captain America: The Winter Soldier, will be released. Here’s a look:

Beware of Backdoor Legalism

Dan Darling:

Last week, during an apparent display of debauchery at the Grammy’s (I don’t usually watch award shows. It’s just not my thing. Other folks feel that way about NFL football, which I love). This caused award-winning singer, Natalie Grant to walk out. She was, from all accounts, not self-righteous or judgmental about it, but just posted a simple explanation about it on her Facebook page.

Of course, this action provoked conversation online, on Twitter and in blogs. Perhaps the most prominent reaction is Laura Turner, who clearly disagreed, writing in her blog for Religion News: “But reading about her decision to leave early and then publicize that decision sounded to me just like the self-righteousness of those people who couldn’t hear a swear word without their faith being threatened.” Now I respect Turner’s instincts here and I have those same ones myself. Christians have, at times, developed an isolationist bent, a sort of fundamentalism that rejects any thoughtful engagement with the world. This inward inpulse has often put us on the same side as the Pharisees who couldn’t entertain a Savior who hung out with the very people he came to save: the sinners, the needy, the sick.

10 Hot Tips For The Christian Life

Jeff Medders:

There is no secret to Christian growth. Paul actually despises any idea of some hidden, underhanded way of Christianity.… The gospel is an open statement of the truth: We need Jesus and Jesus gives us all that he is by faith in his person and work. No more hot tips, only more of Jesus. “Tips must decrease, he must increase.” The Christian life isn’t that complicated.

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I Get Very Suspicious When…

Stephen Altrogge:

My generation is infatuated with the new and immediate. We love the newest gadgets and newest movies and newest theological ideas. We would be wise, to paraphrase C.S. Lewis, to let the fresh winds of church history blow through our musty brains.

I’m about 95% sure that at least one person who reads this post will remind me of the fact that many Christians owned slaves. In response I would say two things. First, it is my educated guess that many men and women throughout church history who have defended sinful practices were not born again. This is the case when it comes to the Crusades, slavery, the Spanish Inquisition, and many other sad events. These events and practices were promoted by those who embraced cultural Christianity not true Christianity.

But this is not always the case.

Get The Heroic Boldness of Martin Luther in today’s $5 Friday at Ligonier.org

Today you can get The Heroic Boldness of Martin Luther by Steven Lawson (hardcover) for only $5 in today’s $5 Friday sale at Ligonier.org. Other items on sale:

  • John by R.C. Sproul (ePub)
  • Together for the Gospel 2006 (audio & video download)
  • Are We Together? by R.C. Sproul (ePub and MOBI)

$5 Friday ends tonight at 11:59:59 PM Eastern. And don’t forget—Ligonier is also offering The Gospel Focus of Charles Spurgeon by Steven Lawson is free until the end of the month.

What does it mean to be gospel-centered?

Progressing Downward

Tullian Tchividjian:

A couple weeks ago I talked about Reader’s Digest Christianity, and how it reduced the Christian faith to pithy, easily-achievable goals that ensure our personal improvement. Here, I have a different (though depressingly similar) target: “LiveStrong” Christianity. LiveStrong bracelets are today even more popular than the infamous WWJD bracelets were 10 years ago, despite the public fall from grace of their namesake, Lance Armstrong.

A Free Gift to Celebrate Crossway’s 75th Anniversary

…we’re giving away the ESV Study Bible Web App for FREE through the end of November. This award-winning resource features the study notes, maps, charts, illustrations, and theological articles found in the print edition—all integrated intoESVBible.org’s easy-to-use web interface.

 The Value of Shutting Up

Mike Leake:

I know that “shut up” isn’t a nice term. We discourage our kids from using that term. But I think a violent term like that is needed here. “Shut up” is what you tell yourself to do when a million feelings are running wild in your heart and you know that it wouldn’t be good to share those feelings.

Oh, wait. Do people still do that? Or have we bought into the idea that letting our feelings fly is always the best course of action?

#TGC11 Day 1 Reflections—Plus Free Stuff!

Emily and I took a few minutes last night to chat about the first day of The Gospel Coalition’s national conference. Sufficed to say, we had an awesome time. But for a few details on why we felt this way, as well as some info on a book giveaway that starts today, watch the video:

Update: As I mentioned in the video, I hadTWO copies of Don’t Call It a Comeback to give away (reviewed here Monday).

The winners have now been selected and notified via email. Thanks for entering!

Take Some of My Books!

Wednesday night, I started packing up my books (long story). While packing up, I found a whack of books that need to not be in my house anymore.

There are a few that just need to not be read by anyone ever again (they’re not as bad as, say, The Power or The Shack, but they’re pretty high up there on the “killing your brain cells” chart)… but there are a few others that I’m either not going to be reading again or have extra copies of.

Rather than go to the local second-hand bookstore, I wanted to offer you, dear readers, the opportunity to take some of my books!

Here are the ones I’m giving away:

Seeds of Turmoil by Bryant Wright (read the review)

Once an Arafat Man by Tass Saada (read the review)

Respectable Sins by Jerry Bridges

Hear No Evil by Matthew Paul Turner (read the review)

Free Book by Brian Tome (read the review)

Plan B by Pete Wilson (read the review)

Too Small To Ignore by Wess Stafford

As you can see, it’s a pretty diverse bunch of books.

So here’ the deal: Tell me which ones you want and they’re yours. That’s pretty much it.

Are there any restrictions? Only that I’m going to give preferential treatment to anyone who lives nearby so I can save on postage :)

Start calling dibs in the comments and let me know before the end of the week, otherwise they might end up on some unsuspecting person’s doorstep!

UPDATE: All the books have been claimed. Thanks for taking some of my books!