Sweeter Founds than Music Knows

© Gareth Weeks

Sweeter founds than music knows
Charm me, in EMMANUEL’S name;
All her hopes my spirit owes
To his birth, and cross, and shame.

When he came the angels sang
“Glory be to GOD on high,”
Lord, unloose my stamm’ring tongue,
Who should louder sing than I.

Did the Lord a man become
That he might the law fulfil,
Bleed and suffer in my room,
And canst thou, my tongue, be still.

No, I must my praises bring,
Though they worthless are, and weak;
For should I refuse to sing
Sure the very stones would speak.

O my Savior, Shield, and Sun,
Shepherd, Brother, Husband, Friend,
Every precious name in one;
I will love thee without end.

John Newton, Hymn 37

John Newton: The Wheat and the Tares

Though in the outward church below
The wheat and tares together grow;
Jesus ere long will weed the crop,
And pluck the tares, in anger, up.

Will it relieve their horrors there,
To recollect their stations here?
How much they heard, how much they knew,
How long amongst the wheat they grew!

O! this will aggravate their case!
They perished under means of grace;
To them the word of life and faith,
Became an instrument of death.

We seem alike when thus we meet,
Strangers might think we all are wheat;
But to the Lord’s all–searching eyes,
Each heart appears without disguise.

The tares are spared for various ends,
Some, for the sake of praying friends;
Others, the LORD, against their will,
Employs his counsels to fulfill.

But though they grow so tall and strong,
His plan will not require them long;
In harvest, when he saves his own,
The tares shall into hell be thrown.

John Newton, Though in the Outward Church Below, Hymn 86 in Olney Hymns

Around the Interweb (01/24)

“It is Well with My Soul…”

Churches Helping Churches released a powerful video presentation of the devastation in Haiti on Friday, one that is tempered with incredible hope: 

At 4:57, Mark Driscoll interviews a pastor from Haiti who, despite everything, still has joy. When asked why he’s smiling, where is his joy, he answers, “It’s from the Lord.” 

God is good, folks. 


 

In other news

John Newton in a letter to Rev. Thomas Jones (October 20, 1767): “As to myself, if I were not a Calvinist, I think I should have no more hope of success in preaching to men, than to horses or cows.” (via Kevin DeYoung

“Tell Bud, ministry isn’t everything.  Jesus is.” (via Ray Ortlund

Ed Stetzer: “Be careful with your words. You only have so many to use in your upcoming sermon, so choose them wisely. Those words may comprise your very last sermon. Have you considered that?” 

More photos from Haiti (via Compassion’s Flickr page): 

[vodpod id=Groupvideo.4540560&w=425&h=350&fv=offsite%3Dtrue%26offsite%3Dtrue%26lang%3Den-us%26page_show_url%3D%252Fphotos%252Fcompassioninternational%252Fsets%252F72157623133539077%252Fshow%252Fwith%252F4293585965%252F%26page_show_back_url%3D%252Fphotos%252Fcompassioninternational%252Fsets%252F72157623133539077%252Fwith%252F4293585965%252F%26set_id%3D72157623133539077%26jump_to%3D4293585965]

more about “Haiti Earthquake“, posted with vodpod 


In case you missed it

Here are a few of this week’s notable posts: 

My review of Joshua Harris’ new book, Dug Down Deep. Read the review then go buy the book. 

Airing my frustration with progressive sanctification

If the gospel is dull, then what is worth being called exciting

Martyn Lloyd-Jones reminds us that the gospel is the most exciting and astounding thing that has ever and will ever happen.

Amazing Grace for a New Year

[vodpod id=ExternalVideo.911677&w=425&h=350&fv=]
more about “Amazing Grace“, posted with vodpod

Amazing Grace is perhaps the best known hymn by English poet and pastor, John Newton (1725-1807). Although first published in 1779, the hymn was written as an illustration for Newton’s New Year’s Day, 1773, sermon. Its lyrics are a powerful reminder of the mercy of God, who alone offers salvation to ill-deserving sinners—to a wretch like me.

Amazing grace! How sweet the sound,
That saved a wretch like me!
I once was lost but now am found
Was blind, but now I see.

‘Twas grace that taught my heart to fear,
And grace my fears relieved;
How precious did that grace appear
The hour I first believed!

Through many dangers, toils, and snares,
We have already come;
‘Tis grace hath brought me safe thus far,
And grace will lead me home.

We have already come;
And grace will lead me home.
His word my hope secures;
As long as life endures.

The Lord has promised good to me,
His word my hope secures;
He will my shield and portion be
As long as life endures.

Yes, when this flesh and heart shall fail,
And mortal life shall cease,
I shall possess, within the veil,
A life of joy and peace.

The earth shall soon dissolve like snow,
The sun forbear to shine;
But God, who called me here below,
Will be forever mine.

Happy New Year, everyone.