Looking Ahead: Books I'm Looking Forward to in 2010

Looking at the books I enjoyed most over 2009 made me think about the ones I’m really looking forward to in 2010. Here are a few:

Doctrine: What Christians Should Believe
by Mark Driscoll and Gerry Breshears

This book, a 464 page systematic theology based on Driscoll’s preaching series in 2008 is bound to leave an impression. About the book:

Doctrine is the word Christians use to define the truth-claims revealed in Holy Scripture. Of course there is a multitude of churches, church networks, and denominations, each with their own doctrinal statement with many points of disagreement. But while Christians disagree on a number of doctrines, there are key elements that cannot be denied by anyone claiming to be a follower of Jesus. In Doctrine: What Christians Should Believe, Driscoll and Breshears teach thirteen of these key elements. This meaty yet readable overview of basic doctrine will help Christians clarify and articulate their beliefs in accordance with the Bible.

3D.DugDownDeep%20copy.jpgDug Down Deep
by Joshua Harris

Joshua Harris’ latest book focuses on the practical importance of theology in the life of every believer as it shares Harris’ journey to having an informed knowledge of God as the foundation of his spiritual life. From the book:

The irony of my story—and I suppose it often works this way—is that the very things I needed, even longed for in my relationship with God, were wrapped up in the very things I was so sure could do me no good. I didn’t understand that such seemingly worn-out words as theology, doctrine, and orthodoxy were the pathway to the mysterious, awe-filled experience of truly knowing the living Jesus Christ.

They told the story of the Person I longed to know.

Dug Down Deep will be released on January 19th (and my ARC arrived on Tuesday!)

Read a review of the first chapterRead a review of the rest of the bookOrder [Read more…]

Around the Interweb (12/27)

Breaking Spiritual Strongholds

A new story from The Difference is Jesus.com:

Ajinta and her family worshipped Maran Buru and other spirits and performed witchcraft to bring prosperity to their home. But instead of prosperity, she found only strife. Sickness prevailed in her home and fights raged, despite their fervent prayers and the sacrifices they offered.

In times of illness, they went to witch doctors to perform the rituals of calling upon spirits for recovery. Their lives revolved around sickness and fear. Instead of being delivered from their plight, Ajinta and Bablu, her husband, only found more tension.


In other news 

Andy Naselli on hermeneutics

The Wonder of Apple’s Tablet (via Josh Harris)

What Do David and Saul Have to Do With Christmas?

Tim Challies and Luke Muehlhauser are exchanging letters on faith. It’s pretty interesting so far.


In case you missed it

Here are a few of this week’s notable posts:

Republishing Charles Spurgeon’s “The First Christmas Carol:” Part one | Part two | Part three

A short film on whether or not the Christmas story really happened

Win a copy of John Piper’s Don’t Waste Your Life

Joshua Harris: Don't Waste Your Church

HT: Sean Chandler

Sunday Shorts (06/14)

Josh Harris: My Run-in with Borat

A great story on the need for discernment:

Thoughts on Evangelical Superstardom

Kevin DeYoung offers a very insightful follow-up to John Piper’s recent article on Hero Worship v. Holy Emulation. Here’s an extremely important excerpt:

[D]on’t like someone just because others do, and don’t dislike someone just because others like him. Both are dangers in a celebrity culture. Some people wait on the corner just looking for bandwagons they can hop on. Others–the too cool for school crowd–have a dire fear of being a part of something popular. These folks decide to dislike an author or pastor or speaker or band or movie just because all their friends rave about them. I understand the reaction, but you don’t have to be a groupie to be edified. Don’t like Calvinism or Piper or Driscoll or whatever because it’s cool. And don’t be the cynical I-hate-labels, why-are-Christians-such-lemmings person either. Give thanks for godliness where you see it, the gospel where you hear it, and good examples when you can find them.

Read the whole article at Kevin’s blog.

The Perfect Technology

Tim Challies wrote this enjoyable article on why he feels books are the perfect technology:

…there is more to a book than its words. A book is an experience, and the experience includes the media through which we consume those words. Reading a book printed on paper, reading a book on a reading device and listening to a recording of a book are, at least in some way, different experiences.

Read the rest at Challies.com.

In case you missed it

Here are a few of this week’s notable posts:

The Persevering Prophet: I Know the Plans I Have for You Exploring the meaning of that famous coffee-cup verse, Jeremiah 29:11.

Book Review: Agape Leadership Reviewing spiritual leadership lessons from the life of RC Chapman.

Made in the Image of God: Choice How humanity images God through the ability to make choices

I Have No Words Zack Morris(!) appears on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon. I am shocked that Mark-Paul Gosselaar didn’t break character once.

Sunday Shorts (05/31)

Just Do Something: A short interview with Kevin DeYoung

Over at Buzzard Blog, they’re featuring a brief interview with Kevin DeYoung, author of Just Do Something: A Liberating Approach to Finding God’s Will. Look for a review of this book here in the next few weeks.

And: Words and Deeds

Hunter Beaumont at The Resurgence offers wise counsel on the relationship between our words and our actions.

Strangely, many emerging pastors say that if a church effectively embodies the gospel, then preaching becomes less important. Others fear that if we welcome unbelievers, we have to water down the message. In reality, just the opposite is true!

Read the rest at The Resurgence.

Should We Use Twitter During Church?

John Piper and Josh Harris both agree: No, probably not. Read both of their reasons why at their respective blogs.

Did you know…

Blogging Theologically is now available for your Kindle. If you’re so inclined, you can subscribe at Amazon.com

In case you missed it

Here are a few of this week’s notable posts:

The Persevering Prophet: Harsh Language A look at the harsh language that the Bible uses to describe sin.

Made in the Image of God: Relationship and Responsibility Looking at how humanity images God through our relationships and different responsibilities.

Week Five: Am I an Adrenaline Junkie? What I’m learning during my fast from podcasts and theology books.

Bono in a Bathrobe?

Regardless of the topic, everyone has an opinion. The other day, I ran across a great quote (courtesy of Kevin DeYoung via Josh Harris) on a certain someone that I know everyone has an opinion on: Jesus, and specifically His popularity.

“Jesus is popular with a lot of people today because they view him as Bono in a bathrobe.”

So, what do you think? Is Jesus popular with a lot of people because they view him as Bono in a bathrobe? Is there more to it for most?

Discuss.

Sunday Shorts (04/26)

The Gospel Coalition 2009 Conference Online

The Gospel Coalition’s 2009 conference messages are now online. Give them a listen as you can’t go wrong with Tim Keller, John Piper, and more.

22 Essential Words for Writing Cheesy Christian Pop Songs

Guest blogger Josh Harris provides us with the essentials of cheesy Christian pop lyrics at Abraham Piper’s blog. The comments are even better than the actual list (check out Abraham’s song in comment 7).

Matt Svoboda’s take on Mark Driscoll

Matt at Evangelical Village posted a very helpful letter he sent to his pastor regarding Mark Driscoll in light of the recent kerfuffle surrounding him. Here’s an excerpt:

I am not here to beat the drum of Mark Driscoll, but it would sadden me to see people disregard his ministry for inappropriate comments and occasionally taking things further than Scripture permits.  His ministry is gospel-centered as he always points people to the cross.  As you and I would say, he is ‘Our Kind of Calvinist.’  He is theologically and missionally as solid as anyone I know.

Aaron’s on Twitter

I caught the Twitter bug while watching all the hip cool marketing folks at ad:tech this week. Next week I might write haikus.

If you’re on Twitter, you can follow me here.

And in honour of this, I once again (ironically) present, The Twouble with Twitter: