Links I like

Kindle deals for Christian readers

And over at Westminster Bookstore, you can get Hide or Seek: When Men Get Real With God About Sex by John Freeman for $9.99 or $7 when you buy five or more.

The Great, Redemptive Multi-Tasker

Nick Batzig shares a great meditation on Christ.

The King Who Never Married

Petar Nenadov:

It’s an odd story when the king never marries. Ancient kings not only married, but also married again and again. And if dozens or hundreds of wives could not suffice, there were always concubines.

Wouldn’t a king who never married be some kind of lesser king?

Is World Magazine A Muck-Raker?

David Murray:

This New York Times headline caught my attention yesterday: A Muckraking Magazine Creates A Stir Among Evangelical Christians. I scrolled through my mental rolodex and couldn’t imagine what magazine they could possibly be writing about. I clicked through to discover that it was World Magazine they were referring to.

Yes, World Magazine! A muckraking magazine?

Stunned, I could only assume that World Magazine had suddenly fallen into Rupert Murdoch’s hands, or that the highly-respected editorial team had been ousted in a Hollywood Reporter coup, or that I had missed some World-shattering online revelations in the week since I’d last read the magazine.

Not alphabet soup: the truth about Psalm 119

Jesse Johnson:

Psalm 119 is the longest poem in the Bible. It is the longest prayer in the Bible. It is the longest acrostic in the Bible. It is the longest chapter in the Bible. It stands at the center of the Bible, and it is about the Bible. The longest Psalm is a psalm about Psalms. The most intimidating chapter in the Word is also a chapter about the Word.

Links I like

Kindle deals for Christian readers

The Kindle editions of the NIV Application Commentary set are on sale for just $4.99 or less each:

Being Content with Saying No to Truly Good Opportunities

Randy Alcorn:

I once felt guilty about declining most requests, so I was reading a dozen books a year for endorsements, saying yes to friends who wanted me to speak, meeting people who were coming through Portland, etc. But then I was always behind writing my own books, and writing is my primary calling. Now I decline nearly all speaking requests (I travel and speak maybe five times per year, and often there’s a second angle to what I say yes to—staying extra days to see my kids and grandkids, getting vacation time with Nanci, etc.).

My advice is to care about people but use discernment, and don’t live to please them. We are to live out our lives before the Audience of One. In the end, His approval is the one that matters. If our goal is to hear others say, “Well done,” we won’t have time, energy and perspective to do what we need to do to hear Him say it. Paul said, “If I were still trying to please man, I would not be a servant of Christ” (Galatians 1:10).

The real voice of Darth Vader

Oh my…

My journey away from contemporary worship music

Dan Cogan:

Over the years when I would occasionally hear a hymn, the language was always strikingly foreign, with Ebenezers and bulwarks, diadems and fetters. Which only served to confirm my bias that hymns were simply out-of-date. They had served their purpose. They had run their course.

The problem with my youthful logic only began to dawn on me about seven years ago. I had come to recognize that these ancient hymns accomplished something that the new songs weren’t. While contemporary worship seemed to take the listener on an exciting and emotional rollercoaster, the old hymns engaged the mind with deep and glorious truths that when sincerely pondered caused a regenerated heart to humbly bow before its King.

A Plea To Pastors and Pastor Search Committees

Mike Leake:

About five years ago when we were moving from Missouri to Louisville a particular church was in contact with us about coming on board. They requested an audio sermon. We weren’t set up very well for recording sermons but we figured out a way to get a couple sermons recorded.

I sent the audio to the church and heard NOTHING. Of course they may not have received the sermon. But I wouldn’t know that either because they never responded to my email where I enquired as to whether or not they had received the sermon.

So my only assumption was that they must have hated the sermon, thought I was terrible and that I was a heretic. I’m exaggerating a bit, but it was incredibly discouraging.

On the wrong side of history

Carson, Keller and Piper tackle this common objection.

Links I like

Kindle deals for Christian readers

Discipleship in the “Age of Authenticity”

Trevin Wax:

Another good word for “authenticity” is non-conformity. The point of non-conformity is being true to yourself as opposed to whatever self others may want you to be true to. That’s why much of the drama in our culture of authenticity comes from the casting off of societal constraints. Note the four areas Taylor mentioned in his definition.

31 movies with one letter dropped from the title

This is awesome.

New Advent resource: The Dawning of Indestructible Joy

Desiring God has released a brand-new Advent devotional from John Piper. Get yours free at DesiringGod.org.

Being a Non-Conventional Intern

Joey Cochran:

Not for me. I’m a non-conventional intern. I graduated with my Th.M. from Dallas Seminary in 2009, then entered my first pastorate in Tulsa as a High School Pastor. After four years, I departed as an associate pastor and have been a church planting intern with Joe Thorn at Redeemer Fellowship in St. Charles, Illinois for the past year.

I remember one of the first times I shared this story with another pastor. They asked: “Aren’t you taking a step back?” Well, yes, and at the same time, no.

The Missing Ingredient in Many Sermons

Erik Raymond:

Like cooking, preaching can become bland. It can fail to have that freshness worthy of the gospel table. There are many reasons why. One could identify a lack of preparation, lack of understanding, poor delivery, and shallowness. We would not disagree that under-cooking the homiletical meal is a problem. But there is something else that can make preaching bland: the deadly reality of not being personally wowed by the subject.

Links I like

Kindle deals for Christian readers

Although not a sale book, but Internet-friend/conference pal Jeff Medders’ first book, Gospel Formed, is coming out in a few days. Be sure to preorder a copy!

Sign up for Paul Tripp’s Thanksgiving devotional

Sign up for 12 email devotionals adapted from Tripp’s New Morning Mercies: A Daily Gospel Devotional starting November 17 and running through American Thanksgiving. These short devotions take about five minutes to read, but will spur you to reflect on God’s Word all day long. In addition, everyone who signs up will be entered to win one of 50 fabulous mustache mugs:

Tripp-Thanks-social-media-ad-02

Who wouldn’t want a Tripp’s ‘stache mug, I ask you?

How Can You Tell if Someone Has Truly Repented of Grievous Sin?

R.C. Sproul Jr:

There is one tell-tale fruit, but it may take a long time for it to happen. And even then you likely won’t see it. But here’s the fruit nonetheless—if the sinner ends up in heaven, you will know they had truly repented. If not, they likely had not. I understand the desire to know the sincerity of another’s repentance. I’ve been in countless pastoral situations wherein it seemed like the answer to that one question—is this person truly repentant—determined the answer to every other question about what should be done. Trouble is, God has not been pleased to give us the means to peer into the souls of others.

So what do we do?

Where do Christians Witness Most? Online or Offline?

David Murray discusses some interesting data from a recent Pew Research survey.

Spurgeon Center expands Midwestern’s ‘For the Church’ vision

Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary’s launch of the new Charles Spurgeon Center for Biblical Preaching expands the seminary’s “For the Church” vision by what its president, Jason K. Allen, said will be “an international hub” for Spurgeon studies, biblical preaching, the study of historical theology, pastoral ministry locally and globally “for the church at large.”

Calling the events leading up to the center’s announcement and impending construction a “kairos moment” during the seminary’s annual trustee meeting in Kansas City on Oct. 20-21, Allen expressed his appreciation for Bill and Connie Jenkins of Paoli, Ind., whose generosity enabled Midwestern to move forward with the $2.5 million construction project to house the Spurgeon Library.

My Strange Bedfellow

Lore Ferguson:

For as long as I can remember I have wakened to guilt. It is a pulsating thought with root in no particular sin or crime, just a carried burden that I have done the world, and the Lord, an irreparable wrong. It is not a quiet guilt, but a raging one. It consumes me on some days and on the days when it doesn’t, it reminds me it is coming soon for me again. I remember Augustine’s, “For what am I to myself without You, but a guide to my own downfall?”

Guilt is my roadmap to repentance—even when I’m not sure what it is I’m repenting for.

Links I like

Kindle deals for Christian readers

And finally, (at least on the Kindle front), be sure to check out these titles from Joel Beeke ($2.99 each): The Beauty and Glory of the FatherThe Beauty and Glory of Christ, and The Beauty and Glory of the Holy Spirit, and The Beauty and Glory of Christian Living.

This is grace

So good:

Church Membership ‘Back Home’ Is Not Enough

Dave Russell:

Should college students join a local church by campus if they have a church membership “back home”?

I’m often asked this question in reference to Christian students who are coming to college and have a church membership “back home.” Here are five things to consider that may help to answer.

Three Crucial Things Single People Need To Know

Stephen Altrogge:

Our culture tells us that the single years are supposed to be an adventure. A time of fun and craziness and exploration before we settle down for the boring life of marriage, kids, and all that jazz. To sow our wild oats (if you happen to be Amish). To quote the prophet Ricky Martin, the single years are for, “Livin’ la viva [vida?] loca.”

Right?

Well…sort of…not really. After working with a lot of single men and women over the years, there are certain principles and practices (hopefully derived from Scripture!) that I would encourage single folks to develop which will serve them for many years into the future. These practices aren’t particularly exciting or thrilling, but I believe they’re extremely valuable.

So what would I tell single guys and gals? Three things.

Pharisees Need Jesus, Too

Aaron Earls:

For a Christian, there may be no bigger insult than to be called a Pharisee. I mean, those guys caught the brunt of Jesus’ rebukes and were the primary reason for His being falsely accused and put to death.

At the same time, there may be no greater personal satisfaction than ripping someone’s Pharisee-like attitudes and actions. They bring so much harm to the cause of Christ. They give us all a bad name. And yet they need Jesus, too.

Links I like

Kindle deals for Christian readers

Baring It All for Us

S.D. Kelly:

This is the new frontier of the culture wars: the progressive-conservative clash resounding in personal experiences of twenty-somethings, each blow landing with a dull thud. These experiences may seem like the front lines, but this is only true to the person actually living the specific life. Being a young adult is inherently banal and harrowing all at once as the foundation is laid for the decades to follow: leaving home, finding (or not finding) love, finding (or not finding) a job. And in the specific lives of Lena Dunham and Jill Duggar, we — their audience — watch their every move, expecting them to not only share it all with us, but to tell us what it means, to give us the key to the good life. Lena and Jill are the heirs to Aristotle. Not that Kind of Girl andGrowing Up Duggar the sequels to Nichomachean Ethics.

The Strange Case of the Imploding Ministers

Mike Glenn:

Ministers don’t explode. You never hear of a pastor grabbing an Uzi and shooting up a congregation. Ministers implode. That is, the pressure on the outside becomes greater than the pressure on the inside and we’re crushed like an empty soda can. Ministry, however you express it, is giving yourself away. Unless we are intentional to refill our souls, we’ll soon get to the place where we have nothing to give.

So, what do we do? Perhaps the ministry of Jesus would offer some helpful lessons. What kind of patterns do we see in the life of Jesus? Several come to mind.

Throw Open The Doors

Nick Horton:

How many of us have gone through something similar? The exhilaration of pregnancy leads to nervous unease as the days pass. Husband and wife pray, and wait, hoping this pregnancy will make it. Hoping this one is viable. If the heartbreak of miscarriage comes and the news wasn’t shared, then it will be less people to share such pain with. There is no shame to share with everyone. No one has to know you failed…. wait.. what?

God Writes a Great Story

Christina Fox:

I recently picked up a book my son was reading and flipped through it, noticing that a number of pages were folded down. Curious, I asked him why he did it.

“Because those are all my favorite parts,” he responded.

He’s a boy after my own heart because I do the same thing. I dog-ear and mark up my books so I can go back and reread my favorite parts. In some books though, there are no pages folded down. In those books, I found myself editing as I read, thinking of ways I would have written it differently, parts I would have added and scenes I would have deleted altogether.

How does a McRib really get made?

While I’m not a fan of McDonald’s food (or business practices, or…), I definitely respect their desire to dispel rumors about what actually goes into their products:

Doesn’t make me want to eat a McRib, but it’s nice to know, regardless.

Links I like

Book deals for Christian readers

Let’s start with a few new Kindle deals:

Over at WTS, there are a couple of really good deals going on: You can get Tim Keller’s latest, Prayer, for $17, or $13 when you buy three or more copies. Mindscape by Timothy Z. Witmer is $12 or $9 when you buy five or more. And Marty Machowski’s latest family devotional, Prepare Him Room, is $7 (this one ends tomorrow, so act fast!). And on the digital side, you can get a number of new eBook titles from Crossway for as low as $3.99.

Be ready to suffer

The Myth of Hate

Alan Shiemon:

I’m told writing this post won’t matter. I can clarify until I’m blue in the face and nothing will change. It doesn’t matter what Christians actually think or believe about homosexuality. It seems the world will still believe what it wants to believe no matter what anyone says.

But I still have hope. So, I’m putting this out there. The most common misconception about Christians and homosexuality is that Christians hate homosexuals. Though there are some things Christians have done to contribute to this impression, it’s largely untrue.

How to Leave Your Church Without Hurting It

Mark Dance:

Those of us who have the privilege of serving on a church staff will eventually leave our ministry posts. I recently resigned from the church I have loved and served for thirteen years in order to accept my new ministry assignment to serve pastors with LifeWay. I would like to share a few lessons I learned from this transition that may help make your last Sunday a happy ending rather than a hurtful one.

Why I’m a Single Issue Voter

Joe Carter:

God, as has often been noted in this election season, is neither a Republican nor a Democrat. From this obvious truth many people draw the conclusion that their choice in candidates and policies is therefore morally equivalent. It isn’t.

There are certain issues that transcend political parties and partisan politics and for Christians who believe in the Biblical ideal of justice, the protection of innocent human life, and defense of human dignity, are nonnegotiable.

How Christians Will Know They Can Join Hands With Rome

This is an important reminder of the real issues dividing Protestants and Roman Catholics. While appreciating our points of agreement is a good thing, we shouldn’t ignore our significant differences.

Links I like

Kindle deals for Christian readers

Also, be sure to get a copy of Sexual Brokenness and the Hope of the Gospel, a new eBook edited by Russell Moore collecting messages from the recent ERLC conference in Nashville. It’s currently $2.99 at the ERLC website.

An Unimaginative Tool for Church Growth

Erik Raymond:

If the evangelical church were a boat then it would have some leaks. And everyone seems to have an opinion as to the problem. If I could put the two most common critiques in buckets they would be 1) the preaching, 2) the appetite of church members. In my years of ministry I have often found it quite ironic that many evangelicals complain about preaching not being “biblical” while pastors often complain about “evangelicals today who don’t want biblical preaching”.

Somebody cue the Alanis Morissette.

Why Writing Style Matters

Justin Taylor shares a great quote from Stephen J. Pyne’s Voice and Vision: A Guide to Writing History and Other Serious Nonfiction.

How Should We Then Mock?

Jeremy Larson:

But what are Christians to think about the practice of “making fun”? The word fun is right there in the phrase, so how bad can it be? Christians don’t want to unnecessarily begrudge people their happiness or fun, but there does seem to be an inherent aversion among Christians to using mockery (openly) to have fun.

So, as a Christian, it is with some trepidation that I broach the subject of viewing mockery as a valid and effective tool for Christians to use. This viewpoint is not particularly PC, and I fully expect some readers, after hearing my proposal, to head straight for the nearest chicken coop to gather stray feathers, and then to begin warming up the tar.

Why “the Right Side of History” is so Often Wrong

Aaron Earls:

When we argue that a certain position on the topic du jour – be it same sex marriage, abortion, pornography, etc. – will be on “the right side of history,” we assume the future will agree with moral changes we have made.

But who knows exactly what the philosophical framework of the future will be? They may (and likely will) regard our morality with the same derision we often regard the moral perspective of the past, which is itself another problem with this type of reasoning. Ironically enough, arguments about the right side of history often fails to grant a voice to history itself.

Links I like

Kindle deals for Christian readers

A couple of big ones for you today:

Spurgeon’s Calvinism, edited by Stephen McCaskell, is $2.99 through today, and How People Change by Timothy Lane and Paul Tripp is free until the end of the day. Also on sale are Visit the SickPrepare Them to Shepherd, and Conduct Gospel-Centered Funerals by Brian Croft (2.99 each); The Enemy Within by Kris Lundgaard ($2.99); Preaching and Preachers by Martyn Lloyd-Jones ($3.79); God’s Will by J.I. Packer ($2.99); Autopsy of a Dead Church by Thom Rainer for 99¢; and Know the Creeds and Councils by Justin Holcomb is $1.99. Be sure to also check out this post for more terrific Kindle deals.

Martin Luther’s definition of faith

This is super good stuff.

God Has Changed You and Is Changing You

Colin Smith:

Would you be more likely to say “God is changing me” or “God has changed me”?

Many Christians are comfortable saying the former, but some of us might hesitate to say the latter: “God has changed me.” We are much more likely to say, “I have a lot more changing to do. I’m a work in progress. I haven’t yet arrived.”

There is indeed a continuing process of sanctification happening within the believer, but the completed work of regeneration is of equal importance. Regeneration is the complete transformation that begins the continuing process of sanctification.

It seems that many Christians have a good grasp on the continuing process, but perhaps a more tenuous grasp of the completed work. So here are seven Scriptures that speak clearly of Christ’s completed work in you as a believer.

Russell Moore interviews Rosaria Butterfield

Very challenging and encouraging stuff here from the ERLC conference:

How an awakened conscience speaks

Ray Ortlund shares a moving letter from Steve Tompkins, one of the remaining pastors at Mars Hill Church.

On Being a Pessimist in a Progressive Age

Matthew Lee Anderson:

I was once asked by a reporter whether I thought the “young evangelicals” were going to give up the bigotry of their parents. After I finished laughing, I promptly rejected the question and provide a different one of my own. The poor reporter (probably) wasn’t malicious, but she didn’t have many theological categories either. We talked for an hour…and exactly three of my sentences appeared in print.

I tell that story only to highlight one fact about the press, which by now is well known: many of its members simply don’t “get religion.” Just two days ago, a major news organization published a story that would be laughable, except it isn’t: it’s sad, and media theological ignorance does genuine harm to the cause of Christ.

Kindle deals for Christian readers

large_5145995754

There are a whole bunch of new Kindle deals this week. Here are a few definitely worth checking out:

$1.99 and under:

$2.99:

Christ-Centered Exposition Commentaries ($2.99 each):

$3.99 and over:

Links I like

Kindle deals for Christian readers

This is the last week to save on a few of these deals from Crossway:

The most epic safety video ever made

This is pretty cool:

Is an actor’s pretend sin still sin?

Clint Archer:

Imagine you are assigned the role of Lady Macbeth or Darth Vader or Judas. Someone has to play the villain. And no director would allow you to massage Shakespeare’s script; “Out, out darn spot” doesn’t quite have the same ring to it. And, except for the role Jim Caviezel snagged in The Passion, even good guys sin—The Good the Bad and the Ugly demonstrates this as adequately as the Die Hard franchise.

Here are two very basic guidelines my actor friends employ when selecting scripts.

Forgotten providence

Rebekah Earnshaw:

Twenty-first century sensibilities dismiss the idea of an overruling God in preference to self-direction. Healthy, wealthy, intelligent, capable humans take responsibility and control of their own future through education, insurance, prudent financial investment, savvy work choices and the occasional international holiday. Christianity seems to have outgrown providence.

But life isn’t always quite so neat, is it? Our self-built image of control is all-too-easily shattered by chronic or mental illness, sudden tragic death, redundancy, relationship breakdown, and injustice. Very occasionally we realize what a tiny fragment of the vast order of the universe we actually occupy or understand.

7 Wrong Reasons to Join a Church

Nick Batzig:

Committing yourself and your family to a local church is one of the most important decisions you will ever make this side of eternity; and yet, for all the weightiness of it, it is a decision to which the larger part of church attenders have given little to no thought. Over the past three decades, I have witnessed multitudes of individuals and families choose to join churches for the wrong reason(s). While there is a plethora of helpful resources out there to help people understand the right reasons to join a church, the right reasons to leave a church and the right way to leave a church, there is very little that speaks directly to wrong reasons to join a church. While more could be added to them, here are 7 common wrong reasons for which people join churches.

Biblical inerrancy and the greener pastures fallacy

Scott Redd:

The evangelical community of the biblical interpreters has its faults, some of them quite embarrassing, as does any community subjected to the finitude and fallenness of the human race, but scholarly communities that reject the inerrancy of Scripture have a slew of new problems with which they must deal, problems which by no means leave their scholarship on more certain grounds. What is so often presented as the settled consensus of the scholarly community when attacking an evangelical interpretation becomes, at best, a hypothetical guess when discussed within an unguarded scholarly community. When the goal is not the belittling of a fundamentalist interpretation, one discovers welcome intellectual humility.

Links I like (weekend edition)

Is it My Fault? 

Justin and Lindsey Holcomb’s excellent book, Is It My Fault?: Hope and Healing for Those Suffering Domestic Violence is on sale for the Kindle for $3.99. Do not let this deal pass you by.

Age of Ultron, Heaven and Previews that Oversell or Undersell

Joey Cochran:

I’m not gonna Jesus Juke a punchline at the end of this article. I’m going to show you my cards right here. The reality is movie previews are similar and dissimilar to Sunday Worship. Movie trailers preview movies and they often oversell; Sunday worship previews heaven and it cannot oversell.

And speaking of Age of Ultron

I’m pretty sure this doesn’t oversell the movie:

Four Kinds of Church Leaders Who Won’t Lead Revitalization

Thom Rainer:

So why aren’t more church leaders being intentional in leading church revitalization? As I have conversed with church leaders, I have found four types of church leaders who are resistant to leading church revitalization.

A Day in the Life of Stock Photos

Aaron Earls:

Stock photos serve a purpose, but very rarely is that purpose to show what real life actually is. While your life is full of ups and downs, stock photos pretty much just establish an impossible to meet standard of every day life.

So what would it be like to live a day in stock photo life? Nothing like your life or mine.

It’s a Genesis-to-Revelation Issue

This is a really good interview with Andreas and Margaret Köstenberger about their new book, God’s Design for Man and Woman: A Biblical-Theological Survey

Links I like

Book deals for Christian readers

Here are a whole pile of Kindle deals to get you started (note, most of these are academic references, but books you’d likely want in your library):

Also on sale are a number of volumes from the ZECNT series:

And a few volumes in the Expositors Bible Commentary series:

At Westminster, you can get a great deal on Resisting Gossip by Matthew C. Mitchell. Get a 10-volume pack for your small groups for $50 (includes five copies of the book and five participants guides), individual copies for $8 and digital editions for $4.

Finally, today’s $5 Friday deals at Ligonier include:

  • The Truth of the Cross by R.C. Sproul (hardcover)
  • The Christian Mind: 2012 national conference messages (DVD)
  • Sola Scriptura: The Protestant Position on the Bible (ePub)

The Presidency of the Holy Spirit

Ray Ortlund:

Our forefathers used to call this “the presidency of the Holy Spirit,” when the Lord himself would preside over the gathering of his people in such a way as gently, wonderfully to take charge.

I have seen this.  Doubtless, many of you have as well.

The Most Honest Atheist In The World

David Murray engaging with Crispin Sartwell’s article at the Atlantic, Irrational Atheism: Not Believing in God Isn’t Always Based on Reasoned Arguments And That’s OK.

McDonalds vs organic food

This is amazing (be sure to turn on the subtitles):

The Softer Face of Calvinism

This is a really good interview between Kevin Emmert and Oliver Crisp, author of Deviant Calvinism.

The American Jeremiad

Matt McCullough:

Rhetoric of decline is almost always rhetoric of persuasion. It aims to diagnose a problem and prescribe a solution. We must be careful to assure the prescriptions and their expected results don’t go beyond what God has actually promised.

Links I like

Kindle deals for Christian readers

The theme of this week’s Crossway deals is pretty transparent (but very welcome):

Also on sale:

What We Can Learn From Gamergate

Richard Clark:

It all started with a scandal. One woman slept with other men, and one man took umbrage, posting personal chat-logs with her as “proof” of videogame nepotism and corruption. The result was “Gamergate,” a videogame-related witch-hunt the likes of which none of us have ever seen before.

Gamergate is an online controversy centered around both the treatment of women in videogames and ethics in videogame journalism. The active campaign operates primarily out of the concern that there is a general “groupthink” in videogame journalism centered around feminist and generally progressive concerns.

Of Michael Landon and Brittany Maynard

This is so good.

Bible Ignorance

Mark Jones:

People who have an excellent understanding of the Scriptures really impress me. If there’s one thing I detest, besides Manchester United, it’s Bible studies or theological discussions where the Scriptures function like the crumbs in a bag of chips: you get to them only if you’re desperate.

As someone who has had the pleasure and displeasure of examining candidates for the ministry, I can tell you that many candidates suffer from a lack of basic bible knowledge. They (kind of) know their five points of Calvinism – I wish they knew the other twenty – but they have no idea what the five Levitical offerings are. They know two Latin words (duplex gratia), which they say ad infinitum, ad nauseam, but they don’t even know whether the cupbearer, the baker or the candlestick-maker forgot Joseph in prison.

The Church and Women at Risk

Lindsey Holcomb:

Violence against women is a global epidemic that affects women and girls of all socioeconomic backgrounds, ages, religions, cultures, and ethnicities. Some women and girls, however, are particularly vulnerable to abuse. The phrase “women at risk” or “at-risk women” is used to describe women most susceptible to exploitation and violence, such as women and girls living in poverty and girls younger than 18.

Because life can be tragic for women, it is crucial to have a biblical understanding of how the church can protect and care for women at risk.

Abraham, Cultural Distance, and Offering Up Our Moral Conscience

Derek Rishmawy:

All too often in these discussions of troubling texts, we collapse the cultural distance between us and the biblical characters. Human nature is, in many ways, constant. Conscience is one of those basic human features. Across cultures, everybody has a clear sense of right and wrong, norms against which we must not cross, and an internal compass about these sorts of things. That said, any student of culture knows there are some significant variations across cultures as well. “Self-evident truths” held by post-Enlightenment Americans are not all that apparent to equally intelligent Middle Easterners or citizens of the Majority world. The conscience of a 1st Century citizen might be very sensitive about an issue you and I wouldn’t blink twice about, and vice versa. Our cultural presuppositions and plausibility structures do a significant amount of work here.

Where does this come in with Abraham? Well, I think it becomes a factor in two ways: cultural distance and revelational distance. These two are bound up with each other.