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What Is Reformation Day All About?

Robert Rothwell:

At the time, few would have suspected that the sound of a hammer striking the castle church door in Wittenberg, Germany, would soon be heard around the world and lead ultimately to the greatest transformation of Western society since the apostles first preached the Gospel throughout the Roman empire. Martin Luther’s nailing of his ninety-five theses to the church door on October 31, 1517, provoked a debate that culminated finally in what we now call the Protestant Reformation.

A Holy Indifference

John Johnson:

Working through John, I have been struck with how Jesus’ emotions often seem to run on a flat plane. It’s not that Jesus is unemotional, monotone. He is not the Prozac Jesus often portrayed in film. But the deeper I looked into Jesus in John, the more surprised I was with His responses. They are not always what we would expect. Jesus occasionally appears to be aloof, distant—almost cold. Sometimes, it seems He is not listening. As Culpepper, in his wonderful book, Anatomy of the Fourth Gospel, writes: “Jesus seems to be congenitally incapable of giving a straight answer.”

More Kindle deals!

5 differences between Catholic theology and the gospel

Jesse Johnson:

With Reformation Day this week, it is a good time to remind ourselves of what exactly the differences are between the Roman Catholic Church and Protestants. Certainly on just about every single area of theology there are differences, but here are what I think are the five most glaring and significant issues that separate the Catholic Church from the gospel of grace.

What we mean when we say, “can we talk?”

decisionmade

HT: Z

Links I like

Michael Haykin on Luther and the 95 Theses

Reformation Day Kindle deals!

Thursday isn’t just Halloween—it’s Reformation Day! Here are a bunch of books that have been put on sale in honor of the birth of Protestantism:

Free eBook: Christ-Centered Preaching & Teaching

The Gospel Project is offering a free e-book examining different perspectives on Christ-centered preaching and teaching featuring:

  • Ed Stetzer, Editor (LifeWay Research)
  • Daniel Block (Wheaton College)
  • David Murray (Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary)
  • Walt Kaiser (Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary)
  • Bryan Chapell (Grace Presbyterian Church in Peoria, IL)

Zeal Without Knowledge

R.C. Sproul:

Many people are surprised, and some are shocked, when they hear of my involvement in the charismatic movement years ago.

It began in 1965, shortly after I returned from graduate study in Holland to teach philosophy and theology at my alma mater. Some of my senior students who were preparing for ministry kept talking to me excitedly about their experiences with the Holy Spirit and about receiving the gift of tongues. My first response was profound skepticism, because my only previous experience had been with hardcore Pentecostals whose views of sanctification I deemed aberrant. Soon, however, the sheer number of my students involved in this phenomenon, coupled with their high level of competence as students, provoked me to give them the “philosophy of the second glance.” I also saw reports that tongues-speaking was breaking out in mainline denominations such as the Presbyterian, Methodist, Episcopalian, and Lutheran churches. Reports of outbreaks at Notre Dame and at Duquesne University also piqued my curiosity.

Backwards Compatible Church

Mike Leake:

I’m part of the Nintendo generation, but if I’m being honest I prefer LEGO’s. Churches would be far more healthy if they were backwards compatible. The gospel is timeless. Yes, some of our methods for delivering the message of the gospel has to change with the culture. But at the end of the day while the gospel is able to make it’s home in any culture, it is ultimately transcultural. Centering a church on the glory of God isn’t something that you’ll need to change with a new pastor.