Around the Interweb (07/11)

Matt Chandler on Realigning Your Church to the Gospel

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HT: The Resurgence

In Other News

My friend Matt Svoboda made an exciting announcement this week: He’s replanting a church in Kearney, Nebraska! I’m very excited about this opportunity for him; I hope you’ll join in prayer for much fruit in this ministry.

Tim Smith at the Resurgence offers some practical ideas for family worship.

Meet the Rizers: Got kids? Want to give them something that’s actually pretty decent to listen to? Try Meet the Rizers; check out the sample or buy the whole record:

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Meet the Rizers, posted with vodpod

In Case You Missed It

Here are a few of this week’s notable posts:

Who are the real heroes of social justice?

Book review: Surprised by Grace by Tullian Tchividjian

Preaching is not Speeching

John Calvin: Self-Ignorance Deceives, but Knowledge Humbles

Around the Interweb (06/06)

Exchange: The Truth & The Lie

The Resurgence’s 2010 conference featuring Mark Driscoll, Francis Chan, Kevin DeYoung, Peter Jones and many others is coming to San Diego on June 17-18.

Are you going? If so, let me know in the comments or contact me. Maybe we can grab a Starbucks while we’re there.


A New Update from Matt Chandler

In Other News

North Korean Christians are a great example (HT: Matt Svoboda)

Desiring God announces the public beta their new website. Go over and check it out.

Ray Ortlund: A Note to the “Truly Reformed”

Kevin DeYoung asks Andy Naselli why “let go and let God” is a bad idea

In Case You Missed It

The audio & manuscript from May 30th’s sermon from Poplar Hill Christian Church, Obedience: The Fruitful Life

A review of The Journey to Truth by George Garlick

Do we educate ourselves into slavery?

Who Influences You?

Matt Chandler shares some of the story of his conversion and discusses some of the men who have shaped him:

There are certain people who have been a powerful influence on us, particularly in how we live out our faith.

I’ve spoken of some of them here before. My friends Adam & John have been major influences, particularly as we’ve been wrestling with theology together. Chris, a godly man who took me and a few other guys under his wing at a moment in my life when I desperately needed guidance and counsel. My Friday morning men’s group is increasingly becoming influential in my life as we try to work out .  

But what about you?

Who influences you?

Who has been an influence in the past and who continues to be to this day?

Matt Chandler on being Reformed and Charismatic

Really appreciated this interview with Adrian Warnock & Matt Chandler on how embracing the charismatic gifts plays out in Chandler’s life and ministry. The big ideas from Chandler:

  1. No one swings from chandeliers
  2. Any word that someone may have received is brought privately to the elders
  3. They pray over it and determine its veracity
  4. Sometimes it’s brought out to the congregation, other times it’s not

In short, they’re seeking to handle these kinds of things—like a personal word, a dream or a vision—very, very carefully.

They’re obeying Scripture’s commands concerning such things. To “not believe every spirit, but test the spirits to see whether they are from God” (1 John 4:1).

I tend to approach the charismatic gifts very cautiously, probably as an overreaction to being around a number of people who tended to not test but blindly accept. For me, it’s always interesting and helpful to see how others are approaching them.

What about you? What’s your background on this issue?

Do you think the charismatic gifts are active today and for everyone?

If so, why? If not, why not?

The Latest on Matt Chandler

Very exciting news for Matt Chandler after the latest MRI. Watch the video:

Thrilled for the Chandler family and the Village Church.

Keep praying that God would completely eradicate this cancer.

HT: The Village Church

Update: Even as the Chandlers are celebrating this progress, it’s come to my attention that Zac Smith of NewSpring Church died recently. A few months back, he released an inspiring video testimony about his battle with cancer. Please be in prayer for his family.

Around the Interweb (04/18)

The Bible is its Own Evangelist

From Max McLean’s Unleashing the Word: Rediscovering the Public Reading of Scripture:

The Bible is its own evangelist. I came to faith because I was deeply affected by the words of the Bible. The famous British preacher Charles Spurgeon was once asked how he responded to criticisms of the Bible. “Very easy,” he responded. “I defend the Bible the same way I defend a lion. I simply let it out of its cage.” That quote captures our vision for this book and for the growth of ministries that are committed to the passionate, articulate, and powerful reading of Scripture. Isn’t it time to let the Bible out of the cage, or (to borrow from the title of this book) to unleash God’s Word?

When I tell a Bible story, I have a quiet confidence that God is going to do a mighty work by the very act of reading his Word. Therefore, my objective is to engage hearers and draw them into the Word of God. My role is to use my skills and abilities, as best I can, to draw them into an experience with the Word.

HT: Challies

In Other News

Tim Challies, Kevin Meath and Bob Bevington have teamed up to form Cruciform Press

The New ESV Online is ready for public beta-testing. Sign up to try it out at ESVOnline.org.

The first-ever Gospel Coalition Canadian Regional Conference is this Saturday, April 24. Who’s going?

Christianity’s Surge in Indonesia

Mars Hill Church has released a free five-song EP of music from their Good Friday services. Enjoy!

In Case you missed it

Here are a few of this week’s notable posts:

A review of Dave Roberts’ book, The Twilight Gospel

A review of Steve Chalke & Alan Mann’s new book, Different Eyes: The Art of Living Beautifully

Covetousness, blogging and… Gollum?

Spurgeon on the kind of faith that produces obedience

Two messages from this week’s Together for the Gospel conference: The first from John Piper, the second from Matt Chandler

"My Goal is to be a Faithful Minister of Jesus Christ until He Calls Me Home" – Matt Chandler at Together for the Gospel 2010

Matt Chandler was a special guest at Together for the Gospel 2010, sharing about how his experience with cancer has impacted him and his theology:

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“My goal is to be a faithful minister of Jesus Christ until he calls me home,” says Chandler.

I don’t know about you, but I’m not sure I’ve got that kind of faith. But I want it.

When we suffer, will we suffer well? Will we look at our circumstances with despair or will we join Paul in saying,

For to me to live is Christ, and to die is gain. If I am to live in the flesh, that means fruitful labor for me. Yet which I shall choose I cannot tell. I am hard pressed between the two. My desire is to depart and be with Christ, for that is far better. But to remain in the flesh is more necessary on your account.

Philippians 1:21-24

HT: Matt Robbins

Around the Interweb (04/04)

7 Miles

Matt Chandler explains why the idea that Jesus didn’t really die on the cross is ridiculous:

In other news

The Ten Most Surprising Things About the iPad (via Z)

Jared Wilson shares “10 big reasons why Easter giveaways are a FAIL

Wisdom, Complexity and Chilling the Heck Out

In Case You Missed It

Here are a few of this week’s notable posts:

An interview with Adrian Warnock, author of Raised with Christ

“Too Staggering a claim to remain neutral” – Mark Driscoll and Gerry Breshears on the Resurrection

Maybe the problem is we’re not frightened enough

Martyn Lloyd-Jones on the dishonesty of unbelief

Around the Interweb (03/21)

Christianity Changing China  

Read this very brief article in the China Daily (China’s official English language newspaper). It’s the testimony of a university student who converted to Christianity.  

Now if you’ve been following China for any length of time you might be picking your jaw up off the floor. Get this: 

  • The official and highly controlled newspaper of the Communist government is featuring a story of a religious conversion of an exceptionally bright university student who found meaninglessness in existence apart from God.
  • He was given a Bible by a colleague, and the reader is not led to believe this is a bad thing.
  • He converted to Christ after reading it and now is experiencing fulfillment.
  • And he’s now happily attending an unregistered church (i.e house church).

Whoa. 

We know the church is unregistered because yesterday the China Daily ran an article on house churches that are thriving in Beijing and featured that church. In fact, this particular unregistered church has actually been allowed to purchase property for a church building.  

This doesn’t discount the fact that persecution still occurs in China. But we need to let this news soak in. This little article is huge. God is doing something incredible in that great nation 

 Keep praying. 

HT: Desiring God (via Z)  


In Other News  

Tullian Tchividjian: Counterfeit Gospels  

The latest on Matt Chandler’s health & cancer treatment. Overall pretty encouraging. Keep praying.  

The latest on Michael Spencer’s health. The prognosis is grim. Pray hard.  


  

Want a free copy of Start Here by Alex & Brett Harris?   

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You can enter multiple times. All names will be entered into a spreadsheet and the winner will be chosen at random via Random.org. Contest closes Friday March 26, 2010. The winner will be announced after confirming their mailing address. Best of luck and thanks to all who enter!  

Read a review of the book.  


In Case You Missed It  

Here are a few of this week’s notable posts:  

Jude: Contending to Keep Us From Stumbling  

A review of Brian Tome’s latest, Free Book  

P.T. Forsyth on the orator and the preacher  

Introducing our new daughter, Hannah Grace

Around the Interweb (02/28)

Ruined for Anything Else

Tim Challies shares a story from his life as he looks at the resurgence of Reformed theology. An excerpt:

I once went on a weekend men’s retreat that featured teaching from several local pastors. We heard some interesting messages about serving our wives, about being men of integrity and so on. . . . The thing that has remained in my mind, though, was one of the sermons delivered that weekend. While we had received a steady diet of topical sermons, one of the pastors stood and delivered what was, in effect, a biblically-grounded expository message. He simply opened up the Bible and explained to us what it meant and how we could apply it to our lives. He gave us real doctrine—true meat instead of mere milk.

As we walked from the meeting room to our cabins I could tell there was a buzz running through the crowd of men. They had enjoyed the sermon and had been electrified by it. But they had no category for it. I heard comments like, “I don’t know what that was, but it was amazing! I wish we could hear more teaching like that!”

It was a pivotal moment for me. It drove home to me something that the Bible teaches but something I had never really seen before—that true believers want and eventually need to move from milk to meat. Though they may not have a category to describe what is missing from their lives they will feel a restlessness. The Spirit works in them to give them a craving for solid food. And when they take a bite of that food, their eyes light up and they know that they are experiencing something that they were meant to enjoy.

It’s a pretty powerful piece; go read it in it’s entirety.

In Other News

Another bit of news from Tim Challies: His redesigned blog is now up and running. It’s quite nice.

Matt Chandler will be a special guest at Together for the Gospel this Spring. He’ll be taking CJ Mahaney’s spot to share what God’s been teaching him through his struggle with brain cancer. The latest video update on Matt’s health is up at the Village’s pastor’s blog.

Ray Ortlund: How the Devil spoke through Peter

Another update on Michael Spencer’s health.

In Case You Missed It

Here are a few of this week’s notable posts:

A review of Erwin Lutzer’s latest, When a Nation Forgets God

Are you being confident or presumptuous when you take risks?

Truth, Love and Jonathan Edwards

Charles Spurgeon on the difference between true and false humility

Around the Interweb (02/07)

Preacher-Idolatry and the Promise of “All Things”

From David Murray, Professor of Old Testament and Practical Theology at Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary in Grand Rapids, Michigan:

What do you do if people start idolizing you or your preaching? “I wouldn’t mind some of that!” you retort. Well, okay, maybe it won’t happen to many of us on a large scale. And most of us have the opposite problem. But, if even one person starts to “follow” you or your sermons excessively (and that can happen in the smallest of congregations), how should you respond?

The Apostle Paul’s answer to preacher-idolatry was, “All things are yours” (1 Cor. 3:21). I was first stunned by this verse 17 years ago when Don Carson lectured on 1 Corinthians 1-3 at the Free Church College in Edinburgh. It began a revolution in my worldview that continues to expand and develop to this day. All things are mine! It’s almost unbelievable, isn’t it? I think Paul knew that too. That’s why in the next verse he expands and underlines it. “Whether Paul or Cephas, or the world, or life, or death, or things present, or things to come; all are yours.” No wriggle room there is there. He covers everything. But why does Paul introduce this huge truth here? He is primarily addressing the Corinthian problem of idolizing preachers…

Read the whole article.

In other news

This month’s free book at ChristianAudio.com: Religions Saves by Mark Driscoll. Use the download code FEB2010 when purchasing.

Albert Mohler: Hijacking the Brain — How Pornography Works

Tim Challies: On Endorsements

A video update from Matt Chandler on his ongoing battle with brain cancer

An update from Michael Spencer, the Internet Monk, on his cancer battle. Michael’s income ran out in January and his health insurance runs out this month. If you feel led to help with his ongoing medical expenses, you can donate here.

In case you missed it

Here are a few of this week’s notable posts

A review of Angels by David Jeremiah

No Gospel, No Purpose – A review of The Gospel-Driven Life by Michael Horton

On Suffering Well and the Wasted Life

Fear the Boom and Bust

Charles Spurgeon on the wretchedness of pride

On Suffering Well and The Wasted Life

Matt Chandler, center, holds hands with his son Reid, 4, left, and daughter Audrey, 7, in Flower Mound, Texas as they take a walk after a treatment for Matt's brain cancer. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

 

Yesterday, Eric Gorski from the Associated Press published a fantastic article on Pastor Matt Chandler’s battle with brain cancer. If you’ve not read it, you absolutely must.  

In the article, Gorski wrote,  

Matt Chandler doesn’t feel anything when the radiation penetrates his brain. It could start to burn later in treatment. But it hasn’t been bad, this time lying on the slab. Not yet, anyway.  

Another cancer patient Chandler has gotten to know spends his time in radiation imagining that he’s playing a round of golf at his favorite course. Chandler on this first Monday in January is reflecting on Colossians 1:15-23, about the pre-eminence of Christ and making peace through the blood of his cross.  

Chandler’s hands are crossed over his chest. He wears a mask with white webbing that keeps his head still when metal fingers slide into place on the radiation machine, delivering the highest possible dose to what is considered to be fatal and incurable brain cancer.  

Yesterday I was listening (briefly) to Tapestry on CBC Radio One while on the way to read a book and drink a warm beverage. I caught a snippet of an interview with William Lobdell, a journalist who became a Christian in his twenties, served as the religion reporter for one of the biggest newspapers in the U.S. since become an atheist.  

In talking about the Christian worldview, he said something that really caught my attention, which was that,  

Christians see this life as a fleeting moment in light of eternity. So to waste a day, a month, a year… it’s not really a big deal. They think they’ve got all eternity. But for an atheist, because we know this is all there is, we take as much joy as we can and make the most of every moment (my paraphrase).  

[Read more…]

Talk Positively about Your Spouse

Have you noticed that, for the most part, people don’t speak well of their spouses? In entertainment, husbands and wives regularly make sport of each other. Marketing has fully embraced the doofy husband (the man too stupid to understand how an air freshener works but still manages to get the attractive wife).

You know what’s a great way to talk to people about Jesus? Talk positively about your spouse.

Matt Chandler made this point in his sermon, The Path 11: The Reign and Rule of God, when talking about styles of evangelism:

Now, you can live your life in such a way that people will ask questions about your faith. You absolutely can. A way to do that in the real world:

Talk positive your wife.

Talk positive about your spouse. Talk about how awesome she is.

And watch how you’ll draw a crowd. I mean, men will just flock to you. “Hey man, help me, because my girl is driving me crazy…”

And you can to talk about the grace show to you by God Almighty, and then by being a recipent of that grace enables you to give grace and then you’re off and running. So you can live your life in such a way, but you’re eventually going to have to open your mouth. You’re eventually going to have to talk about sin and the cross and our hope in Jesus Christ.

But you have to open your mouth.

So my problem with the relational evangelism method, in my experience, is that you never get around to saying anything about Jesus.

Looking at this, I can’t help but be reminded of 1 Peter 3:1-7,

Likewise, wives, be subject to your own husbands, so that even if some do not obey the word, they may be won without a word by the conduct of their wives, when they see your respectful and pure conduct. Do not let your adorning be external—the braiding of hair and the putting on of gold jewelry, or the clothing you wear—but let your adorning be the hidden person of the heart with the imperishable beauty of a gentle and quiet spirit, which in God’s sight is very precious. For this is how the holy women who hoped in God used to adorn themselves, by submitting to their own husbands, as Sarah obeyed Abraham, calling him lord. And you are her children, if you do good and do not fear anything that is frightening.

Likewise, husbands, live with your wives in an understanding way, showing honor to the woman as the weaker vessel, since they are heirs with you of the grace of life, so that your prayers may not be hindered.

Husbands, do you make a point of speaking well of your wife? Do you treat her with delicacy both when she’s in the room and when she’s not?

Wives, do you speak well of your husband? Do you treat him with respect even when he’s a bit of a doofus?

Around the Interweb (01/17)

Video Update from Matt Chandler

Pastor Matt Chandler of the Village Church in Texas gives an update on his cancer treatment:

HT: The Village Church Pastors’ Blog


In other news

Dan Woolley, a colleague of mine from Compassion International was rescued the other day from the ruins of the Hotel Montana in Haiti! Praise God for this wonderful news! Please give to help with the relief and long term recovery efforts.

2010: Living in the Future. You must read this. My wife’s review: “It made me choke on my own laughter.” So you know it’s good.

Albert Mohler: Does God Hate Haiti?


In case you missed it

Here are a few of this week’s notable posts:

A review of Jim Belcher’s very helpful book, Deep Church

The morning after in Haiti.

Holy Spirit vs. Holy Scripture 

D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones: The Test of a True Teacher

Moralizing Destroys Scripture and Cultivates Pride