Links I like

Kindle deals for Christian readers

Here are a few Kindle deals I’ve found for y’all:

The First Stone

Julian Freeman:

It still amazes me how little the church of Christ can sometimes actually look like Christ. And I say that as a leader of the church, myself bearing the brunt of the blame.

The hypocritical media and self-appointed moral police of our city have brought a man before us who has been caught (on video) in sin. Death threats, drunken stupors, and binges of crack-cocaine — all from a man who should be an example and a leader. They have set this man in our midst. They are testing us, as a society now. It’s clear how the majority of our city feel. As a church, how will we respond to Mayor Rob Ford?

Why a Spurgeon doc?

Nate Smoyer interviews my pal Stephen McCaskell about his Kickstarter campaign for Through the Eyes of Spurgeon. Here’s an excerpt:

Why is Charles Spurgeon so important to make a film about him?

Charles Spurgeon has written more than any author, living or dead. His passion for the gospel in every aspect of his life is something to be admired and imitated. In his lifetime he preached to over 10,000,000 people the good news of Jesus’ loving sacrifice for sinners. This timeless message is the same hope that we as Christians have today. In discovering and unpacking Spurgeon’s life my hope is that others will be encouraged, challenged, convicted and brought into a deeper understanding of the gospel.

How to live in a secular culture

Dave Bruskas:

Christians are a minority in our secular culture, which largely doesn’t honor Jesus. That’s not going to change, but there’s an ongoing debate among Christians about how we approach a secular culture that doesn’t agree with us about Jesus.

As we think about our relationship with our society, it’s important to remember we too were once far from God, but he saved us through his grace. It’s with this grace in mind that Paul teaches us, through his letter to Titus, how we should respond to a secular society.

Train Your Leaders: A Conversation with Barnabas Piper

Trevin Wax:

Trevin Wax: In my experience, it seems like many pastors and church leaders think in terms of programs, and then they look for volunteers who can run the programs. Why is it important to train the people who serve in our churches, and how can this overcome an overly programmatic mindset for ministry?

Barnabas Piper: Programs can serve as valuable frameworks within churches, creating avenues for people to serve. But just as often they can limit a person’s effectiveness, kind of the way a menu tells what you can order at a restaurant but also limits your choices. Churches that have created a limited “menu” have essentially ruled out many people from using the unique gifts God has given them.

By emphasizing training – the development of gifts and calling to serve – churches are moving toward becoming a healthy body. Instead of having a limited number of pieces doing most of the work, it becomes a healthy whole with each person doing what God designed him or her to do.

Ministry Grid exists to help churches train every person and to do away with that limited menu of ministry options so that the whole church becomes a true body serving one another and ultimately serving Christ.