June’s top ten articles at Blogging Theologically

top-ten

Let’s take a trip back in time and check out the top ten posts in June:

  1. God Won’t Give You More Than You Can Handle (July 2009)
  2. Preaching and Pragmatism (July 2011)
  3. Church Buildings: They’re actually useful! (December 2009)
  4. Ministry Idolatry (January 2011)
  5. Seven books I’m planning to read this summer (June 2014)
  6. If the gospel isn’t in it, should we be singing it? (June 2014)
  7. God helps those who help themselves (July 2009)
  8. John Piper on Mark Driscoll & John MacArthur (May 2009)
  9. 3 passages I want to preach (but have been afraid to) (June 2014)
  10. Why I’m thankful for the freedom to disagree (June 2014)

And just for fun, here’s a look at the next ten:

  1. Where Is Jesus In The Old Testament? (June 2011)
  2. Why am I thinking about getting an education (again)? (June 2014)
  3. 3 reasons why some churches don’t grow (that you don’t usually hear) (January 2013)
  4. The Gospel (June 2014)
  5. Should every Christian be in a small group? Yep! (June 2014)
  6. The secret of the Christian’s power (June 2014)
  7. Why I won’t read your book on visiting Heaven (January 2013)
  8. 5 books every new Christian should read (May 2014)
  9. What should I review? (June 2014)
  10. Think about what you read (June 2014)

If you haven’t had a chance to already, I hope you’ll take a few minutes today to check out a few of these articles.

May’s top ten articles at Blogging Theologically

top-ten

Let’s take a trip back in time and check out the top ten posts in May:

  1. Four and a half books I shouldn’t have read as a new Christian (May 2014)
  2. 5 books every new Christian should read (May 2014)
  3. Is anyone really surprised? (May 2014)
  4. 7 signs you’re reading a book by a prosperity preacher (January 2014)
  5. God Won’t Give You More Than You Can Handle (July 2009)
  6. 160 of the most terrifying words I’ve ever read (May 2014)
  7. One of the books that most deeply affected my faith (May 2014)
  8. Ministry Idolatry (January 2011)
  9. Preaching and Pragmatism (July 2011)
  10. Church Buildings: They’re actually useful! (December 2009)

And just for fun, here’s a look at the next ten:

  1. Seven really great book covers (May 2014)
  2. New and noteworthy books (May 2014)
  3. Is it My Fault? by Justin and Lindsey Holcomb (May 2014)
  4. God helps those who help themselves (July 2009)
  5. When the h-word slipped (May 2014)
  6. John Piper on Mark Driscoll & John MacArthur (May 2009)
  7. How to talk when we talk about God (May 2014)
  8. Where Is Jesus In The Old Testament? (June 2011)
  9. 3 reasons I’m reading more fiction (May 2014)
  10. Know the Heretics by Justin Holcomb (May 2014)

If you haven’t had a chance to already, I hope you’ll take a few minutes today to check out a few of these articles.

Links I like

7 Toxic Ideas Polluting Your Mind

David Murray:

The worst kind of poison is the kind that poisons you without you realizing it. There’s no bitter taste, no pain, no sudden weakness, nothing to alarm; yet, the poison is slowly and steadily doing its deadly work.

In such a dangerous condition, our only hope is some kind of test that shows what is undetectable to normal human senses, maybe a scan of sorts that shows up the extent of the poison in our systems? Only then can the antidote be found, prescribed, and taken.

Discipleship in Canada: Sharing Faith and Making Relationships at Church

Ed Stetzer shares some findings from Lifeway’s recent research on the state of discipleship in Canada.

Faking Cultural Literacy

Karl Greenfeld:

There was a time when we knew where we were getting our ideas. In my eighth grade English class, we were assigned “A Tale of Two Cities,” and lest we enjoy the novel, we were instructed to read Charles Dickens’s classic with an eye toward tracking the symbolism in the text. One afternoon while I was in the library, struggling to find symbols, I ran into a few of my classmates, who removed from their pockets folded yellow and black pamphlets that read “Cliffs Notes” and beneath that the title of Dickens’s novel in block letters. That “study guide” was a revelation.

Here were the plot, the characters, even the symbols, all laid out in paragraphs and bullet points. I read the Cliffs Notes in one night, and wrote my B paper without finishing the novel. The lesson was not to immerse and get lost in the actual cultural document itself but to mine it for any valuable ore and minerals — data, factoids, what you need to know — and then trade them on the open market.

With the advent of each new technology — movable type, radio, television, the Internet — there have been laments that the end is nigh for illuminated manuscripts, for books, magazines and newspapers. What is different now is the ubiquity of the technology that is replacing every old medium.

HT: Zach

How To Handle Controversy

Jeff Medders shares some terrific advice from John Newton:

John Newton, writer of Amazing Grace, is also well known for being a prolific letter writer. Volumes of letters.

Newton once wrote to another minister who was about to publish a very critical piece on another pastor. It was destined to spark controversy. And given what has gone on in the internet and the evangelical world—and what will come in the future—Newton’s counsel is wisdom crying aloud in the street for us all.

Too Scared to Cry: Social Media Outrage and the Gospel

Russell Moore:

If mere outrage were a sign of godliness, then the devil would be the godliest soul in the cosmos. He, after all, rages and roars, “because he knows his time is short” (Revelation 12:12). Contrast that with the Lord Jesus who does not “quarrel or cry aloud” (Matthew 12:19).

Why is this so? It’s because the devil has no mission, apart from killing and destroying and accusing and slandering. And it’s because the devil is on the losing side of history.

April’s top ten articles at Blogging Theologically

top-ten

Let’s take a trip back in time and check out the top ten posts in April:

  1. Who are the false teachers? (April 2014)
  2. New Easter devotional: The Last Days of Jesus (April 2014)
  3. God Won’t Give You More Than You Can Handle (July 2009)
  4. Would Paul have used video? Here’s a better question… (April 2014)
  5. Church Buildings: They’re actually useful! (December 2009)
  6. Preaching and Pragmatism (July 2011)
  7. Ministry Idolatry (January 2011)
  8. Taking God at His Word by Kevin DeYoung (April 2014)
  9. God helps those who help themselves (July 2009)
  10. Why I may (not) be live-blogging #T4G14 (April 2014)

And just for fun, here’s a look at the next ten:

  1. Where Is Jesus In The Old Testament? (June 2011)
  2. My top 5 highlights from #T4G (April 2014)
  3. Evangelism by Mack Stiles (April 2014)
  4. John Piper on Mark Driscoll & John MacArthur (May 2009)
  5. 4 things I liked and 3 I didn’t about the new Noah movie (March 2014)
  6. What’s on your to-read pile? (April 2014)
  7. The glamor of God-honoring grammar (April 2014)
  8. Choosing a New Preaching Bible (November 2011)
  9. Why I Believe Amillennialism by Matthew Svoboda (July 2010)
  10. The one reason you should support the Gosnell documentary (April 2014)

If you haven’t had a chance to already, I hope you’ll take a few minutes today to check out a few of these articles.

March’s top ten articles at Blogging Theologically

top-ten

Let’s take a trip back in time and check out the top ten posts in March:

  1. God Won’t Give You More Than You Can Handle (July 2009)
  2. God might call you to be ignored (March 2014)
  3. Memorizing God’s Word: Colossians (July 2013)
  4. Kindle deals for Christian readers (March 2014)
  5. Are Christians really free to smoke pot? (March 2014)
  6. God helps those who help themselves (July 2009)
  7. John Piper on Mark Driscoll & John MacArthur (May 2009)
  8. Church Buildings: They’re actually useful! (December 2009)
  9. Preaching and Pragmatism (July 2011)
  10. Ministry Idolatry (January 2011)

And just for fun, here’s a look at the next ten:

  1. Have the courage to apologize (March 2014)
  2. Where is Jesus Christ? (March 2014)
  3. The Storytelling God by Jared C. Wilson (March 2014)
  4. Jehovah Tsidkenu (March 2014)
  5. Four pieces of leadership “wisdom” you should totally ignore (February 2014)
  6. Where Is Jesus In The Old Testament? (June 2011)
  7. 4 things I liked and 3 I didn’t about the new Noah movie (March 2014)
  8. Being present, as Christians, with lost people (March 2014)
  9. A quick look at some new books (March 2014)
  10. Captivated by Thabiti Anyabwile (March 2014)

If you haven’t had a chance to already, I hope you’ll take a few minutes today to check out a few of these articles.

Links I like

Mohler on Spurgeon

This is long, but worth your time:

HT: Justin Taylor

The Osteenification of American Christianity

Hank Hanegraaff:

Osteenian Scriptorture is not unique. His words and phrases are now mimicked in pulpits throughout the land. As a result, Christianity has been plunged into an ever-deepening crisis. If occult sources such as those referenced in The Secret pose the greatest threat to the body of Christ from without, the deadly doctrines disseminated through the Osteenification of Christianity pose the greatest threat to Christianity from within. To avert the carnage, a paradigm shift of major proportions is desperately needed—a shift from perceiving God as a means to an end, to the recognition that He is the end.

3 Ways to Recognize Bad Stats

Ed Stetzer:

Often times, a statistic is like a piece of candy thrown at a parade—you really don’t know if you should bite into it or not. We’ve all heard Mark Twain’s famous quote about lies and statistics. There is a reason so many people have had skepticism toward stats. Too frequently, people repeat inaccurate, bad, or explicitly made-up numbers.

I’ve written about the issue before—on many occasions. Here at the blog, you can read about a lot about stats, including specifics about bad marriage stats and why we like bad stats in general.

Still, I keep hearing statistics quoted at conferences and through blogs and social media that make me scratch my head in amazement. I’m not sure where some of these stats originate, and I’m the president of LifeWay Research.

So how can you really discern good stats from bad?

How Did Jesus Read the Old Testament?

Nick Batzig:

Another reason why this question has not been asked more frequently is that the Reformed are rightly zealous for application and experientialism. The Bible shoud make a difference on my life. The precious truths contained in it should lead me on to godly living. This is taught everywhere in the pages of Scriptures (e.g. Titus 1:1 and 1 Timothy 4:16). Some have mistakenly thought that if we say that the Scriptures are first and foremost written to and about Jesus that this will somehow lead on to a denial of my need for transformation. In fact, it is only as we see that the Bible is written to and about Jesus that we will experience Gospel transformation in our lives.

With these things in mind, here are 10 ways to help us understand how Jesus would have understood the Old Testament to have been written to and about Himself.

Outrage Porn and the Christian Reader

Tim Challies:

We as Christians are also easily outraged. Sometimes we seem to forget that we are sinful people living in a sin-stained world and that sinners—even saved ones—will behave like sinners. Sometimes we appear to hold the people we admire (or admired) to the impossible standard of perfection. We don’t mind if our historical heroes are deeply flawed, but we can barely tolerate the slightest imperfection in our contemporary heroes. When they fail, or even when they falter, we respond with, you guessed it: outrage. For a few days we light the torches and lift the pitchforks in our empty protests. And then we move on.

Captain Context

So good:

February’s top ten articles at Blogging Theologically

top-ten

Let’s take a trip back in time and check out the top ten posts in February:

  1. God Won’t Give You More Than You Can Handle (July 2009)
  2. Three reasons to keep reading the Old Testament (February 2014)
  3. God helps those who help themselves (July 2009)
  4. Four pieces of leadership “wisdom” you should totally ignore (February 2014)
  5. Church Buildings: They’re actually useful! (December 2009)
  6. Preaching and Pragmatism (July 2011)
  7. Ministry Idolatry (January 2011)
  8. John Piper on Mark Driscoll & John MacArthur (May 2009)
  9. The universal disease of all mankind (February 2014)
  10. Romans 1-7 For You by Timothy Keller  (February 2014)

And just for fun, here’s a look at the next ten:

  1. Where Is Jesus In The Old Testament? (June 2011)
  2. Can you pray for us?  (February 2014)
  3. Your presuppositions shape your response (February 2014)
  4. 7 signs you’re reading a book by a prosperity preacher (January 2014)
  5. Invest by Sutton Turner (February 2014)
  6. A brief look at the 9Marks series  (February 2014)
  7. Leland Ryken wants to help you study The Pilgrim’s Progress (February 2014)
  8. A brand-new site (February 2014)
  9. The original Christian hipster (February 2014)
  10. Evangelism and the Sovereignty of God by J.I. Packer (February 2014)

If you haven’t had a chance to already, I hope you’ll take a few minutes today to check out a few of these articles.

The backlist: the top ten posts on Blogging Theologically

top-ten

Let’s take a trip back in time to see the top ten posts in November:

  1. A Call to Resurgence by Mark Driscoll (November 2013)
  2. God Won’t Give You More Than You Can Handle (July 2009)
  3. She’s done the impossible (November 2013)
  4. John Piper on Mark Driscoll & John MacArthur (May 2009)
  5. Five signs you need to quit blogging (November 2013)
  6. Where Is Jesus In The Old Testament? (June 2011)
  7. Get serious about your studies: how should you read the Bible? (November 2013)
  8. God helps those who help themselves (July 2009)
  9. Get serious about your studies: why a systematic theology? (November 2013)
  10. Get serious about your studies: you and your Bible (November 2013)

And just for fun, here are the next ten:

  1. Church Buildings: They’re actually useful! (December 2009)
  2. Preaching and Pragmatism (July 2011)
  3. Get serious about your studies: you and your technology (November 2013)
  4. Ministry Idolatry (January 2011)
  5. Why we need to pray for the persecuted Church (November 2013)
  6. Black Friday deals for the Christian guy and gal (November 2013)
  7. The terrifying sound of silence (November 2013)
  8. Evangelism is the enterprise of love (November 2013)
  9. Five Points by John Piper (November 2013)
  10. How do we fix the problem of celebrity-ism? (November 2013)

If you haven’t had a chance to read any of these posts, I hope you’ll take a few minutes today to check them out.

The backlist: the top ten posts on Blogging Theologically

top-ten

Let’s take a trip back in time to see the top ten posts in October:

  1. God Won’t Give You More Than You Can Handle (July 2009)
  2. John Piper on Mark Driscoll & John MacArthur (May 2009)
  3. All of Grace by C.H. Spurgeon (December 2009)
  4. God helps those who help themselves (July 2009)
  5. Where Is Jesus In The Old Testament? (June 2011)
  6. Church Buildings: They’re actually useful! (December 2009)
  7. Preaching and Pragmatism (July 2011)
  8. Ministry Idolatry (January 2011)
  9. “Is he humble?” (September 2013)
  10. TV screens make lousy pastors (October 2013)

And just for fun, here are the next ten:

  1. What does the Bible say about worship? (March 2013)
  2. Be convinced and be careful: a final thought on Strange Fire (October 2013)
  3. You’re always being fed—it’s sometimes just cotton candy (October 2013)
  4. That one time I “heard” God speak (October 2013)
  5. Can a true believer blaspheme the Holy Spirit? (October 2013)
  6. If a Christian’s attitude is right: Carson on judgmentalism (October 2013)
  7. Book Review: You Lost Me by David Kinnaman (December 2011)
  8. Charles Haddon Spurgeon: What is Humility? (February 2010)
  9. Why reading books on suffering is good for your soul (October 2013)
  10. The sneakiest way to discredit the truth (October 2013)

If you haven’t had a chance to read any of these posts, I hope you’ll take a few minutes today to check them out.