Seven books I’m planning to read this summer

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Summer’s nearly hear—a fact revealed by the sudden propagation of reading lists! Yesterday, I shared how we’re encouraging reading over the summer for my oldest daughter (we’re also doing something similar for our middle daughter—her goal is to master most or all of the first set of the Bob books). Emily is currently starting to read The Robe by Lloyd Douglas, which, while unlikely to take her all summer, will certainly play a key role in her summer reading.

And then there’s me. I’m pretty regularly setting reading goals for myself, whether it’s a few books that I hope to read sometime over the course of the year, or looking at ways to dig back into my library (this last one I’ve gotten a bit behind on, but it’s recoverable!). So today, I wanted to share a few books I’m planning to read (or have already started) during this summer:

The World is Not Ours to Save by Tyler Wigg-Stevenson. I’m already a little less than half done this one, and it is outstanding. It’s very encouraging to read a book related to my first one that doesn’t make me feel like I’m going nuts for what I wrote in Awaiting a Savior!

Why We Love the Church by Kevin DeYoung and Ted Kluck. It’s been about five years since I read this, and I’ve been looking forward to doing so again. (I might also revisit Why We’re Not Emergent, but we’ll see.)

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring by JRR Tolkien. It’s been 25 years since I last read this book. I’m pretty sure I’m due.

Preaching and Preachers by Martyn Lloyd-Jones. It’s not left my Spring to-read pile yet. It will get done. (Another re-read.)

What is Biblical Theology? by James Hamilton Jr. This looks like it’ll be a short, punchy read. Plus, I love the subject of the book.

Facing Leviathan by Mark Sayers. I received this book at Band of Bloggers this past April and it looks compelling—good leadership books are hard to find (hopefully this is one!).

Stardust by Neil Gaiman. This is another re-read for me, a compelling fairy tale for adults (with minimal shady content, which is always appreciated).

So that’s a few of the books I’m hoping to read this summer. What’s on your list? 

What Are You Reading this Summer?

Summer’s getting frighteningly close (after all, winter ended a week or so back, right?) and that means it’s time to think about vacations! A little time off does everyone good and also gives us the opportunity to do some reading!

A few days ago, Joe Thorn offered some great recommendations for what you might want to read this summer; his focus was on fighting sin and temptation and I’d encourage you to read any number of those ones. As I’ve been looking at what I want to be reading this summer, my list is certainly not going to be quite as focused, but I’m hoping it’ll be interesting:

Christianity and Liberalism by J. Gresham Machen

Machens classic defense of orthodox Christianity established the importance of scriptural doctrine and contrasts the teachings of liberalism and orthodoxy on God and man, the Bible, Christ, salvation, and the church. Though originally published nearly seventy years ago, the book maintains its relevance today. It was named one of the top 100 books of the millennium by World magazine and one of the top 100 books of the century by Christianity Today.

(Incidentally, this is the selection for the latest edition of “Reading the Classics Together” over at Challies.com. That might be a really helpful way for you to get into this book if you’re interested.)

Tempted and Tried: Temptation and the Triumph of Christ by Russell Moore

Although temptation is a common and well-acknowledged part of the human experience, few realize the truth behind temptation and fewer still know how to defeat it. Tempted and Tried will not reassure Christians by claiming that temptation is less powerful or less prevalent than it is; instead, it will prepare believers for battle by telling the truth about the cosmic war that is raging. Moore shows that the temptation of every Christian is part of a broader conspiracy against God, a conspiracy that confronts everyone who shares the flesh of Jesus through human birth and especially confronts those who share the Spirit of Christ through the new birth of redemption.

Moore walks readers through the Devil’s ancient strategies for temptation revealed in Jesus’ wilderness testing. Moore considers how those strategies might appear in a contemporary context and points readers to a way of escape. Tempted and Tried will remind Christians that temptation must be understood in terms of warfare, encouraging them with the truth that victory has already been secured through the triumph of Christ. [Read more…]

What Are You Reading: Summer 2010

Summer’s coming up quick and that means—the possibility of vacations! (Maybe.)

My internet friend Ben Reed just put together a summer reading list and it got me thinking about what I hope to read this summer.

With a couple of trips coming up that include roughly 20 hours of air travel, plus some time off in Grand Bend and a cottage in the “Deep North” with my dad and the family, it seems I’m going to have an opportunity to do some reading when I’m not playing and having fun with Abigail, Hannah and Emily.

So, without further ado, here’s the list:

Preaching & Preachers by D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones. I’ve read parts but never the whole thing and a friend kindly brought a copy home for me from Together for the Gospel.

Lectures to My Students by Charles Spurgeon. Again, another book I’ve read parts of, but haven’t finished.

Christ-Centered Preaching: Redeeming the Expository Sermon by Bryan Chapell. A friend highly recommended putting this book near the top of my to-read pile. I may have to purchase a copy.

C. H. Spurgeon Autobiography Volume One: The Early Years, 1834-1859 & Volume 2: The Full Harvest, 1860-1892 by Charles Spurgeon. My mother-in-law lovingly purchased these for me at Christmas and I’ve been trying to find an opportunity to read them.

Switch by Chip & Dan Heath. It’s been on my to-read pile for a really long time.

The Armageddon Factor: The Rise of Christian Nationalism in Canada by Marci McDonald. As I explained last week, it looks hilarious! I really want to find out who the militant conservative Christians are in Canada and why the rest of the country should fear them. Plus, I’ve got a hold request in at the library (I think).

So that’s the abbreviated list. I’m sure there will be a lot more that gets added as time goes on.

What about you?

What’s your summer reading look like?