Links I like (weekend edition)

Kindle deals for Christian readers

This week, there have been a TON of really good Kindle deals:

Four books by Francis Chan:

The New American Commentary Studies in Bible & Theology series is on sale for $3.99 each:

The Profiles of Reformed Spirituality series is on sale for $1.99 each:

Several volumes in B&H’s Exalting Jesus commentary series are on sale for $5.99 each:

Finally, Zondervan’s got a bunch of titles focused on :

Why leaders fail

Dan Darling nails it:

Recently I had a discussion with some friends about some public leadership fails in the news. I could name them, but you likely already know who they are. Our conversation turned to a general topic of leadership and things we’ve observed. What struck us was how these things evolve from little, seemingly insignificant decisions that form the culture out of which unhealthy leadership grows. In other words, nobody wakes up one day and says to himself, “I’m going to strive to be an authoritarian leader who wreaks havoc on the people I serve.” It just doesn’t happen that way. Leaders start with good intentions. They start as “normal” people. So how do leaders fail? I think there are five basic mistakes leaders make.

Biblica Hipsteria

This is so good:

Why Curious People Don’t Get Bored

Tim Challies:

There were two weeks left in summer vacation. Two of my kids were sprawled on the couch in dejected boredom, wishing they could just watch a little more Netflix or play a little more Flappy Bird. One of my kids was wide-eyed, staring into the pages of a book. And it occurred to me: Curious people don’t get bored. People with a deep sense of wonder don’t get bored. People with a deep desire to appreciate the world around them and to learn its secrets—these people have developed a resistance to boredom.

Sam Harris wants everyone to get spirituality

Kimberly Winston on an altogether unsurprising development:

“Our world is dangerously riven by religious doctrines that all educated people should condemn,” he writes in the book, but adds: “There is more to understanding the human condition than science and secular culture generally admit.”

The prescription, Harris holds, is Buddhist-based mindfulness meditation. A Stanford-trained neuroscientist, Harris is a long-time practitioner of Buddhist meditation. He said everyone can, through meditation, achieve a “shift in perspective” by moving beyond a sense of self to reach an enlightening sense of connectedness — a spirituality.

Don’t Be a Fundamentalist (Calvinist or Otherwise)

JD Greear:

When you elevate your doctrinal system too highly, you become a fundamentalist in a second sense: you start to believe that all of God’s graces, or at least the best of them, are found only within your narrow little camp. Again, I am no doctrinal relativist, but it seems that God has chosen to give greater insight into certain areas of Christian life and teaching to people I disagree with on secondary issues than he has to me and the people in my camp. Fundamentalism doesn’t recognize that–in many ways, can’trecognize that. Fundamentalism believes that if you’re not in our camp, and you’re not on the approved list, there is very little you have to say. The best of God’s grace is only with me and mine.

Scenes you’ve seen: blockbusters recreated with stock footage

This is pretty well done:

Links I like

Encourage your church to pray

The ERLC has just put together an insert about the continued persecution of Christians around the world. I hope you’ll print this out for your congregation and include with this week’s bulletin.

Two Questions that May Greatly Improve Your Church’s Ministry

Kevin DeYoung:

I’m no management consultant, leadership expert, or church growth guru. But if you love your church and want to see it as effective as possible–for the sake of evangelism, education, exaltation, and whatever other E’s you may have in your mission statement–try asking these two questions. One is from the pastor for his leaders, and the other is from the leaders for his pastor.

Coffee Shops and Productivity

This is a very helpful article discussing just how productive we really are at coffee shops.

The Use and Abuse of Video Church

Richard Phillips:

For all the blessings of this kind of technology, there are some important limitations to video worship of which Christians should be aware and which call for us to make a wise use of this resource. In short, our live webcast is designed for those who are not able to come to church, not as a substitute for those who would otherwise come to church. With this in mind, let me point out some reasons why we should greatly prefer attending church in person, along with some suggestions for our practice.

 Should My Middle Schooler Date?

The short answer is no. But for a more nuanced answer, read this.

Justice Needs a Face

Bethany Jenkins:

I studied law under some of the top legal minds in the world. I learned about foreign affairs and the Constitution from an adviser to the State Department, corporations law from a former SEC commissioner, and criminal investigations from a United States circuit judge.

Throughout my three years in law school, though, there was one word that my professors never uttered and my classmates and I never mentioned. In fact, I don’t think I ever saw it referenced in any of the hundreds of Supreme Court cases that I read. Yet this one word—hospitality—is integral to the biblical idea of justice, order, and flourishing.

Three of the weirdest Christmas specials ever made

Yesterday I shared a few of the best and worst Christmas songs ever made (although noticeably absent was “Christmas Shoes”). But Christmas doesn’t bring out the weirdest of music—it makes TV even more peculiar than normal. There are so many to choose from that it’s hard to keep the list short. Nevertheless, here are three of the weirdest Christmas specials ever made:

He-Man and She-Ra: A Christmas Special

Yep, you read that right. He-Man and She-Ra had a Christmas special. “Special” doesn’t quite explain this one:

Pee-wee’s Christmas Special

Yeah, I know. It’s Pee-wee Herman, so of course it’s going to be weird. But still:

And, of course, I’ve saved the best (or weirdest) for last:

The Star Wars Holiday Special

“Life Day,” wookies, Princess Leia singing, and Bea Arthur.

Yep.

This was so bad that even George Lucas (who has not yet disowned the prequel trilogy) has done all he can to make sure it never again sees the light of day. Try as he might, it’s still out there:

Anything you think should be added to this list? 

Are Multisite Preachers Losing the Value of Being a Shepherd?

Interesting commentary from Perry Noble and Matt Chandler:

(RSS Readers: Can’t see the video? Click through to the site.)

Chandler’s point is particularly interesting: Because preachers can become disconnected regardless of the size of the church where they serve, the question is not so much a multisite one as a pastoral-shepherding one. If so, it leads to a couple of questions to consider (and ones I’d love to get some feedback on from a few of the pastors reading):

  1. Do you agree or disagree with the assessment that it’s not so much an issue of the multisite model as it is the temptation for pastors to disconnect from one-to-one shepherding?
  2. Is the question, even if viewed as a pastoral-shepherding one, even the right question? Does it create a division between shepherding and preaching that doesn’t necessarily need to exist?
  3. How do you structure your time to “balance” one-to-one and congregation-wide shepherding?

Around the Interweb

The Only Hope We Have, And It Is Hope Enough

Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law by becoming a curse for us—for it is written, “Cursed is everyone who is hanged on a tree”—so that in Christ Jesus the blessing of Abraham might come to the Gentiles, so that we might receive the promised Spirit through faith. (Galatians 3:13-14)

R.C. Sproul from Together for the Gospel 2008 on the curse motif of the atonement:

HT: Kevin DeYoung

Also Worth Reading:

Controversy: Michael Krahn on what he thinks John Piper meant when he tweeted, “Farewell, Rob Bell.” (Incidentally, Piper responded: “Pretty close.”)

Men: A Bigger Problem Than “Boys Will Be Boys”

Bible: What About the Issues Scripture Doesn’t Address?

Documentary: The Life of George Whitefield as told by The Doctor, Martyn Lloyd-Jones. Apparently this video will no longer be available after March 31, so watch it while you can. It’s fascinating stuff:

In Case You Missed It:

Book Review: Rid of My Disgrace by Justin and Lindsey Holcomb

Husbands, Date Your Wives

What Good Will Come From the Bell Brouhaha?

Richard D. Phillips: Your Witness Matters

Meet My Friend Deni Gauthier

Thomas Watson: Let Us Imitate Our Father

Tears of Hope

Last year, the story of Zac Smith from Newspring Church shared his testimony of battling cancer. A few months after the video was released, he succumbed to cancer and went home to be with the Lord.

His wife, Mandy, recently shared how God has used these events and the hope she and her children find, even in the midst of tears:

Hurting People Need Something from the Outside

Disgrace is the opposite of grace. Grace is love that seeks you out even if you have nothing to give in return. Grace is being loved when you are or feel unlovable. Grace has the power to turn despair into hope. Grace listens, lifts up, cures, transforms, and heals.

Disgrace destroys, causes pain, deforms, and wounds. It alienates and isolates. Disgrace makes you feel worthless, rejected, unwanted, and repulsive, like a persona non grata (a “person without grace”). Disgrace silences and shuns. Your suffering of disgrace is only increased when others force your silence. The refusals of others to speak about sexual assault and listen to victims tell the truth is a refusal to offer grace and healing.

To your sense of disgrace, God restores, heals, and re-creates through grace. A good short definition of grace is “one-way love.” This is the opposite of your experience of assault, which was “one-way violence.” To your experience of one-way violence, God brings one-way love. The contrast between the two is staggering.

One-way love does not avoid you, but comes near, not because of personal merit but because of your need. It is the lasting transformation that takes place in human experience. One-way love is the change agent you need for the pain you are experiencing.

Unfortunately, the message you hear most often is self-heal, self- love, and self-help. Sexual assault victims are frequently told some version of the following: “One can will one’s well-being” or “If you are willing to work hard and find good support, you can not only heal but thrive.” This sentiment is reflected in the famous quote, “No one can disgrace us but ourselves.”

This is all horrible news. The reason this is bad news is that abuse victims are rightfully, and understandably, broken over how they’ve been violated. But those in pain simply may not have the wherewithal to “pull themselves up by their bootstraps.” On a superficial level, self-esteem techniques and a tough “refusal to allow others to hurt me” tactic may work for the short term. But what happens for the abused person on a bad day, a bad month, or a bad year? Sin and the effects of sin are similar to the laws of inertia: a person (or object) in motion will continue on that trajectory until acted upon by an outside force. If one is devastated by sin, a personal failure to rise above the effects of sin will simply create a snowball effect of shame. Hurting people need something from the outside to stop the downward spiral. Fortunately, grace floods in from the outside at the point when hope to change oneself is lost.6 Grace declares and promises that you will be healed…

From Rid of My Disgrace by Justin & Lindsey Holcomb (pp 15-16). Read the forward by Mark Driscoll, the introduction and first chapter here.)

Below, Justin Taylor interviews authors Justin and Lindsey Holcomb about the book. Give it a look:

(HT: JT)

Around the Interweb (08/01)

D.A. Carson’s “The God Who Is There” Audio Now Available

The audio for D.A. Carson’s lecture series, The God Who Is There, is now up at the Gospel Coalition. A new DVD series is being released in the fall. Here’s a preview:

[vodpod id=ExternalVideo.961150&w=425&h=350&fv=]
Audio and Video for D. A. Carson’s The God Who …, posted with vodpod

In Other News

Conference Message: Burk Parsons answers the question: “Is Calvinism good for the Church?”

News: Has the environmental damage from the BP oil spill been exaggerated?

Ministry Opportunities: Desiring God has a number of internships available. Check it out.

In Case You Missed It

Here are a few of this week’s notable posts:

The audio from July 25’s sermon, Spiritual Poverty and the Worship of God

A review of Andreas Kostenberger & Michael Kruger’s latest, The Heresy of Orthodoxy

John Piper answers the question, “Should Christians read the “holy” books of other religions?

Some thoughts on Abigail’s favorite new record, Meet the Rizers

Eschatology Matters (even if we don’t want it to)

Calvin: Knowing yourself begins with knowing God

“Who Am I that I Should Have Been the Object of His Mercy?”

C.J. Mahaney is the founding pastor of Covenant Life Church in Gaithersburg, Maryland and the author of several books including Humility: True Greatness.

His testimony is a powerful testimony to God’s grace in saving the ill-deserving.